Daily Whip
HOUSE MEETS AT: FIRST VOTE PREDICTED: LAST VOTE PREDICTED:
9:00 a.m.: Legislative Business

Five “One Minutes”
9:45 – 10:45 a.m. 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
 
H.Res. 971 – Rule providing for consideration of H.Res. 970 – Insisting that the Department of Justice fully comply with the requests, including subpoenas, of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the subpoena issued by the Committee on the Judiciary relating to potential violations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act by personnel of the Department of Justice and related matters (Rep. Meadows – Judiciary) (One hour of debate). The Rules Committee has recommended a closed Rule that provides for one hour of general debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on the Judiciary.  The Rule waives all points of order against the legislation. Members are urged to VOTE NO.

Complete Consideration of H.R. 6157Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2019 (Rep. Granger – Appropriations).  H.R. 6157 appropriates $606.5 billion in FY2019 base discretionary budget authority for the Department of Defense – plus an additional $68.1 billion in discretionary budget authority designated for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO).  These funding levels are consistent with the recent budget agreement that raised the Budget Control Act (BCA) spending caps, which increased the FY2019 defense cap by $85 billion, and allowed an additional $69 billion in OCO.

The measure includes a military pay raise of 2.6%.  Also, the bill continues provisions prohibiting the transfer of Guantanamo detainees to the U.S or closure of the facility. It also includes funding for sexual assault prevention and response programs in the military and suicide prevention and outreach programs.

The Rule provides for no further general or amendment debate.

Postponed Amendment Votes (5):
 
Gallagher Amendment #7
Gallagher Amendment #8
Clark Amendment

Foster Amendment

Courtney Amendment

Bill Text for H.R. 6157:
PDF Version

Background for H.R. 6157:
House Report (HTML Version)
House Report (PDF Version)

H.Res. 970 – Insisting that the Department of Justice fully comply with the requests, including subpoenas, of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the subpoena issued by the Committee on the Judiciary relating to potential violations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act by personnel of the Department of Justice and related matters (Rep. Meadows – Judiciary) (One hour of debate). H.Res. 970 is being brought to the Floor in order to lay the groundwork to discredit and undermine Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and ultimately Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. President Trump and Republicans would love nothing more than to stop the lawful investigation being conducted by Mueller.  In order to protect our democracy, it is essential that this investigation continue without interference or obstruction by Republicans.

This Resolution is an escalation of House Republicans’ conflict with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and the Robert Mueller probe, and repeatedly chastises the Justice Department (DOJ) for alleged “non-compliance” in demanding sensitive documents. It demands that DOJ turn over all requested documents, including documents pertaining to the highly classified FISA surveillance program and documents pertaining to the FBI’s use of confidential informants by July 6th

Members are urged to vote no and reject this partisan witch-hunt. Members are urged to VOTE NO.

Motion to Go to Conference on H.R. 5895 - Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2019
 
THE DAILY QUOTE
“The House resoundingly rejected a far-reaching immigration overhaul on Wednesday, despite a last-minute plea from President Trump, as internal divisions in the Republican ranks continued to hobble legislative efforts to protect the young unauthorized immigrants known as Dreamers. The 121-to-301 vote was an embarrassment both to Mr. Trump and to House Republican leaders, who had spent weeks trying to bring together conservatives and Republicans with moderate views on immigration — and ended up with little to show for the effort. In the end, nearly as many Republicans voted against the bill, 112, as for it, 121. The defeat provided the latest display of the Republican Party’s disunity in Congress on immigration.”

    -     New York Times, 6/27/2018