Hoyer Leads Bipartisan Washington, DC Delegation in Introducing Budget Resolution on Pay Parity

For Immediate Release:

January 30, 2004

Contact:Stacey Farnen
202-225-3130

WASHINGTON, DC – The bipartisan Washington, DC regional delegation, led by House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer (MD), will introduce a resolution next week that would put Congress on record in support of the bipartisan principle of pay parity in its upcoming fiscal year 2005 budget proposal.  The bipartisan group included Democratic Whip Hoyer, Rep. Tom Davis (R-VA), Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Rep. Al Wynn (D-MD), Rep. Frank Wolf (R-VA), Rep. Ben Cardin (D-MD) and Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger. 

The text of the resolution is attached.

“This is a key step in the bipartisan effort to ensure that all civilian federal employees, including employees paid under the Federal Wage System, receive a fair pay adjustment that provides them with parity with the military, as well as recognition for their hard work to keep our country safe and prosperous,” said Hoyer today. 

“I hope that the White House recognizes that this resolution is more evidence that a bipartisan majority in Congress supports the principle of pay parity.  I look forward to reviewing President Bush’s fiscal year 2005 budget next week and hope to find the bipartisan principle of pay parity reflected in his proposals for civilian federal and military employees,” Hoyer added.

There are 1.8 million civilian federal employees across the country - in the Department of Defense alone there are over 600,000 civilian federal employees.  Over the past two decades, both the House and Senate have consistently recognized that Congress and the Executive Branch should not undermine the morale of dedicated Federal public servants by failing to bring their pay adjustments in line with military personnel.

The principle of parity stems from the recognition that the pay for civilian and military employees simply has not kept pace with increases in the private sector.  According to the most recent studies, a 32 percent pay gap exists between the civilian employees and their private sector counterparts and an estimated 5.4 percent gap exists between the military service members and the private sector. 

“Members of the uniformed services and civilian employees of the United States, often working side-by side, make significant contributions to the general welfare, defense and security of our nation.  We should recognize that by enacting a fair pay adjustment for their critical services,” concluded Hoyer.

_______________________

108TH CONGRESS

2D SESSION H. CON. RES.___

Expressing the sense of the Congress that rates of compensation for civilian employees of the United States should be adjusted at the same time, and in the same proportion, as are rates of compensation for members of the uniformed services.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Mr. HOYER submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on _______________

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the Congress that rates of compensation for civilian employees of the United States should be adjusted at the same time, and in the same proportion, as are rates of compensation for members of the uniformed services.

Whereas members of the uniformed services and civilian employees of the United States make significant contributions to the general welfare of the Nation;

Whereas increases in the pay of members of the uniformed services and of civilian employees of the United States have not kept pace with increases in the overall pay levels of workers in the private sector, so that there now exists (1) a 32 percent gap between compensation levels of Federal civilian employees and compensation levels of private sector workers, and (2) an estimated 5.4 percent gap between compensation levels of members of the uniformed services and compensation levels of private sector workers; and

Whereas, in almost every year during the past two decades, there have been equal adjustments in the compensation of members of the uniformed services and the compensation of civilian employees of the United States: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that rates of compensation for civilian employees of the United States should be adjusted at the same time, and in the same proportion, as are rates of compensation for members of the uniformed services.

 

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