Day 9: Still No Strategy from GOP to End Their Shutdown

Now in the 9th day of the Republican government shutdown and just over a week away from running out of extraordinary measures to keep paying America’s bills, House Republicans still don’t have a real plan on how to end their manufactured crises.  As POLITICO reports:

“A reality is beginning to dawn on — and eat away at — many House Republicans: They aren’t at all sure of their party's strategy to re-open government and lift the debt ceiling.”

After forcing leadership to pick a fight it didn’t want to pick, sitting through hours of meetings with lots of internal hand-wringing and failing to force Democrats to negotiate, the path to avoid a prolonged government shutdown and the first debt default in American history is completely uncertain.”

Now, the party is flagging in polls one week into the first government shutdown in nearly two decades. And they’re just eight days ahead of the deadline set by the Treasury to lift the debt ceiling.”

“But this time, as Wall Street lights up the phones of rank-and-file House Republicans and public sentiment turns sharply against the party, things are stuck in neutral. It’s a dynamic that’s worrying senior Republican lawmakers and aides.”

“Boehner, for the time being, is playing it cool. He has told Republicans in closed sessions and in conversations on the House floor that he has ‘something up his sleeve.’ No one is sure what he’s talking about, and he hasn’t revealed his strategy. Several Republicans he is close with says he’s keeping his cards close to his chest.”

And, in a worrisome sign, GOP unity is beginning to fray, little by little. Conservative Republicans are beginning a push to force leadership to handle the debt ceiling and the government shutdown separately — a logistical challenge since the debt limit must be lifted by Oct. 17 and the government has been shut down for a week. This will be a major topic at Wednesday’s Republican Study Committee meeting.”

Since Republicans are currently without a logical fiscal strategy, we’ll offer them one: reopen the government by passing the Senate’s government funding bill, ensure America can pay its debts, and then negotiate a balanced, long-term fiscal solution.