THE DAILY WHIP: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013

For Immediate Release:

March 6, 2013

Contact:

Katie GrantStephanie Young, 202-225-3130

House Meets At: First Vote Predicted: Last Vote Predicted:

10:00 a.m.: Legislative Business

Five “One Minutes” per side

11:00 - 11:30 a.m. 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

H.Res. 99 – Rule providing for consideration of H.R. 933 – Department of Defense, Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (Rep. Rogers (KY) – Appropriations)(One Hour of Debate). The Rules committee has recommended a closed Rule that that provides for one hour of general debate equally divided between the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Appropriations. The Rule allows one motion to recommit, with or without instructions and waives all points of order against the legislation.

With the irrational spending cuts known as the sequester already in effect, House Republicans continue not to take any action to stop sequestration. These arbitrary, across-the-board spending cuts are harmful to our economy and national security. Despite all of this, the Rules committee rejected for the fourth time an amendment that would make in order the Democratic substitute authored by Rep. Van Hollen which would replace the automatic discretionary spending cuts under the sequester. The amendment would increase taxes for individuals with incomes of more than $1 million annually, eliminate agricultural direct payments and cut tax benefits for the oil and gas industry. Over and over House Democrats have put forth a balanced plan to address the sequester and House Republicans continue to refuse to bring the measure to the Floor for an up-or-down vote. The Republican Majority also rejected a motion by Mr. McGovern to consider H.R. 933 under an open Rule. 

H.R. 933 – Department of Defense, Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (Rep. Rogers (KY) – Appropriations)(One Hour of Debate). H.R. 933 funds government operations through the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 2013. The bill contains both a full-year FY13 Defense Appropriations bill and a full-year FY13 Military Construction-Veteran Affairs Appropriations bill. It extends funding for all other government agencies without such adjustment through an extension of the current Continuing Resolution of FY12 policy in effect through March 27.  The further stipulation that sequestration will apply affirms that all federal agencies funded by the bill, including The Pentagon, will face its cuts. This means that the topline discretionary funding rate within the legislation is $984 billion – the level required by sequestration and $59 billion below the Budget Control Act's agreed upon $1,043 billion level.

Although the measure includes full Appropriations bills for Defense and MilCon-VA, updating only these agencies for FY13 realities, it fails to update the remaining 10 Appropriations bills in the same manner. By embracing sequestration, the bill hinders the government's ability to protect consumers, invest in education, and implement critical domestic priorities such as access to affordable health care. As our economy continues to recover, Congress must remain focused on supporting sustained growth and job creation and work together to find a balanced solution to replace sequestration.

 Bill Text for H.R. 933:
PDF Version

Background for H.R. 933:
Committee on Appropriations Democrats Fact Sheet – FY 2013 Continuing Resolution, Defense and Military Construction/Veterans Affairs Appropriations Bill

 
The Daily Quote

“There probably weren't any champagne bottles uncorked in the Capitol on Friday, but there's no question that House conservatives saw the arrival of automatic spending cuts known as the sequester as cause for celebration… ‘God bless our leadership,’ gushed Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, who crossed the speaker last year when he lobbied conservatives against Boehner's debt-ceiling plan. With these spending cuts going into effect, Jordan said, ‘Conservatives in this House of Representatives are making a difference. And that's a complete change from what we saw in the last Congress’… In other words, the first box has been checked off the conservative wish list.”

-    National Journal, 3/3/13