THE DAILY WHIP: WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 2014

For Immediate Release:

July 9, 2014

Contact:

Stephanie Young, Mariel Saez 202-225-3130

House Meets At: First Vote Predicted: Last Vote Predicted:

10:00 a.m.: Morning Hour
12:00 p.m.: Legislative Business

Fifteen “One Minutes”

5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Evening

**MEMBERS ARE ADVISED THAT CLOSE VOTES ARE POSSIBLE TODAY, INCLUDING POTENTIAL VOTES ON AMENDMENTS TO H.R. 4923 – ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2015, RELATING TO PROJECT LABOR AGREEMENTS (PLAs) AND DAVIS-BACON. ANY EXPECTED ABSENCES SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE WHIP’S OFFICE AT x5-3130.

**Members are also advised that the GOP Leadership has announced that votes will occur after 7:00 p.m. when the House is considering Appropriations bills, therefore the House may be voting late into the evening today.

Suspension (1 bill)

  1. H.R. 803 – Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act 2014 (Rep. Foxx – Education and Workforce)

Begin Consideration of H.R. 4923 – Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (Rep. Simpson – Appropriations) (One Hour of Debate). H.R. 4923 appropriates $34 billion in FY 2015 discretionary budget authority for the Department of Energy and federal water projects – a decrease of approximately $50 million from FY 2014, but $327 million above the President’s request.

The measure increases funding for the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile, but cuts funding for fossil fuels and alternative energy programs and nuclear energy research and development. Funding would also be reduced for advanced energy research, environmental cleanup activities, nuclear non-proliferation programs, and most renewable energy programs. The bill also includes numerous controversial policy riders, including two that hinder the Corps of Engineers ability to prevent water pollution and one allowing guns to be carried on all Corps of Engineers lands.

Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the $1.014 trillion discretionary spending cap and the 302(a) discretionary allocations agreed to in the Bipartisan Budget Agreement. By setting the Appropriations Committee's allocation in-line with the Bipartisan Budget Agreement, House Republicans were able to begin the appropriations process early. However, House Republicans have chosen to focus on inserting controversial policy riders into several appropriations bills, slowing down the process and jeopardizing enactment of all twelve appropriations bills before the start of the 2015 fiscal year.

The Rule, which was adopted on June 25, 2014, provides for one hour of general debate and makes in order any amendment offered that complies with the House Rules. Additionally, the Rule provides for 10 minutes of debate per amendment equally divided between the proponent and an opponent and up to 10 pro forma amendments for the purpose of debate offered by the Chair and Ranking Member or their designee.

Bill Text for H.R. 4923:
PDF Version

Background for H.R. 4923:
House Report (HTML Version)
House Report (PDF Version)

TOMORROW’S OUTLOOK
The GOP Leadership has announced the following schedule for Thursday, July 10: The House will meet at 12:00 p.m. for legislative business. The House is expected to complete consideration of H.R. 4923 – Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (Rep. Simpson – Appropriations).

 
The Daily Quote

“With both the legislative calendar and the Highway Trust Fund nearly exhausted, a broad coalition of business groups and labor unions will push this week to shake Congress from its stasis and approve federal infrastructure spending before transportation projects begin to dry up in August. Fierce resistance from conservative Republicans to replenishing the Highway Trust Fund and reauthorizing the federal Export-Import Bank has yielded rare public laments from business leaders about the state of politics — especially in the Republican Party, where Tea Party-fueled populism has undermined the party’s longtime support for business. Business leaders said that inaction by Congress could imperil the economic recovery just as jobs are increasing at a rate that could presage a period of sustained growth.”

-    New York Times, 7/7/2014