THE DAILY WHIP: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

For Immediate Release:

October 8, 2013

Contact:

Katie GrantStephanie Young, 202-225-3130

House Meets At: First Vote Predicted: Last Vote Predicted:

10:00 a.m.: Morning Hour Debate
12:00 p.m.: Legislative Business

Fifteen “One Minutes”

1:30 – 2:00 p.m. 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

H.J.Res. 84 – Head Start for Low-Income Children Act (Rep. Rogers – Appropriations) (40 Minutes of Debate).  This bill provides funding for the Head Start program and other Children and Families Services Programs under the Administration for Children and Families through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR.

Under the Republican government shutdown, Head Start centers are starting to lay off employees and close as they lose their federal support.  Already, at least 7,000 children in five states have lost access to Head Start.  Thousands more could be out of classrooms if this continues into November.  This bill fails to fund any other activities covered by the Labor-HHS appropriations bill that serve this same population of families, including a range of other education programs from the Child Care and Development Block Grant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Assistance (IDEA) special education preschool programs to Title I funding for disadvantaged students to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to the Social Services Block Grant.  The Rule for H.J.Res. 84, which was adopted last week provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.  Members are urged to VOTE NO.

H.J.Res. 83 – Impact Aid for Local Schools Act (Rep. Rogers – Appropriations) (40 Minutes of Debate).  This bill provides funding for the Impact Aid program through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR.   

Under the Republican government shutdown, Impact Aid payments to school districts with high concentrations of federally-connected students, including the children of active military personnel, will be delayed, disrupting the delivery of educational and support services to districts that are already struggling as a result of Republican budget cuts.  Since 2010, Republican cuts to educational investments have decimated local budgets in Impact Aid-receiving school districts, forcing these districts to close summer intervention programs, lay off teachers and instructional aides, and cut back to four-day school weeks. This bill fails to fund any other education programs, including activities that Impact Aid school districts rely upon to serve the same students, such as Title I for disadvantaged students, IDEA for Students with Disabilities, and Title IV, for before-school, after-school, and summer school programs.  The Rule for H.J.Res. 83, which was adopted last week provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.  Members are urged to VOTE NO.

TOMORROW’S OUTLOOK
The GOP Leadership has announced the following schedule for Wednesday, October 9: The House will meet at 12:00 p.m. for legislative business and votes are expected in the House.  The legislative schedule will be announced as it becomes available.

 
The Daily Quote

“Americans are divided on who deserves blame for the government shutdown, but one thing's certain: A solid majority thinks it's wrong to demand changes to Obamacare as a price for reopening the government… Overwhelmingly, Americans think Congress should fund the federal government and deal with health care separately; and just as strongly, Americans oppose including GOP priorities—even those with which they otherwise agree—in a bargain to raise the debt ceiling. The results portend political risk for Republicans should they continue to employ their current approach. Americans oppose those tactics, the data show, and if the government breaches its debt limit, triggering broad-based economic turmoil, Americans could hold Republicans responsible… Americans—by a vast ratio of more than 2-to-1—disapprove of the House GOP tying the future of the Affordable Care Act to funding the government or raising the debt ceiling… The numbers are similar when it comes to the fight over extending the nation's borrowing limit. Following other questions about ways to reduce the country's deficit and the perceived ramifications of failing to raise the debt limit, poll respondents were told that congressional Republicans ‘say they will only agree to increase the federal debt ceiling if President Obama accepts their proposal on other issues.’ Interviewers then asked about four GOP policy proposals—some of which have been found to be popular in previous surveys—but respondents said they opposed including every one of them in a debt-limit agreement by at least a 2-to-1 ratio.”

-    National Journal, 10/7/13