THE DAILY WHIP: THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013

For Immediate Release:

May 16, 2013

Contact:

Katie GrantStephanie Young, 202-225-3130

House Meets At: First Vote Predicted: Last Vote Predicted:

10:00 a.m.: Morning Hour
12:00 p.m.: Legislative Business

Fifteen “One Minutes” per side

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

H.Res. 215 – Rule providing for consideration of H.R. 45 – Patients’ Rights Repeal Act XXXVII (Rep. Bachmann – Energy and Commerce/Education and the Workforce/Ways and Means) (One Hour of debate) The Rules Committee has recommended a Closed Rule that provides for two hours of general debate allocated as follows:

  • 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Energy and Commerce
  • 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Education and the Workforce
  • 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Ways and Means

The Rule allows one motion to recommit, with or without instructions and waives all points of order against the legislation.

The Rules Committee rejected a motion by Ms. Slaughter of New York to consider H.R. 45 under an open Rule. Instead of focusing on jobs and replacing the sequester, House Republicans continue to waste time with yet another pointless vote that would repeal the Affordable Care Act and take away health care benefits and protections enjoyed by millions of Americans. Members are urged to VOTE NO.

H.R. 45 – Patients’ Rights Repeal Act XXXVII (Rep. Bachmann – Energy and Commerce/Education and the Workforce/Ways and Means) (Two hours of debate) This will mark the 37th time that Republicans have voted to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act.  With the Supreme Court’s upholding of the law’s constitutionality and the reelection of President Obama, Speaker John Boehner declared: “Obamacare is the law of the land.”  Even that, however, will not stop Republicans from wasting more time and taxpayer money to force yet another messaging bill through the House. 

The Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law three years ago, has many benefits, including:

  • Already Providing Relief to Millions of Americans:
    • Up to 17 million children with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied health insurance;
    • 105 million Americans – including 71 million in private plans and 34 million in Medicare – have access to free preventive care services;
    • 360,000 small businesses are now taking advantage of the healthcare tax credit to provide insurance to 2 million workers;
    • 105 million Americans no longer have lifetime limits on their coverage;
    • 6.3 million seniors in the “donut hole” have saved over $6.1 billion on their prescription drugs;
    • Almost 13 million Americans have received $1.1 billion in rebates from their insurance companies; and
    • 2,800 employers are taking advantage of the retiree reinsurance program to help cover over 12 million retirees not yet eligible for Medicare;
  • Putting Americans – not insurance companies – in control of their health care by enacting multiple insurance reforms, including:
    • Eliminating pre-existing condition exclusions for kids immediately and for all Americans by 2014;
    • Eliminating lifetime limits and caps on coverage immediately and phasing out annual limits and caps on coverage by 2014;
    • Prohibiting insurance companies from canceling or rescinding your policy if you get too sick;
    • Requiring insurance companies to spend 80-85% of your premium dollars on benefits – not CEO salaries or administrative costs; and
    • Allowing 6.6 million youth up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ insurance policy.
  • Strengthening the Medicare program: Extending Trust Fund solvency by 8 years and reducing costs for seniors by:
    • Providing each senior that entered the donut hole in 2010 with a $250 check to help cover drug costs;
    • Reducing brand name drug costs in the donut hole by at least 50%, discounting generic drug costs, and closing the donut hole entirely over time;
    • Eliminating all co-pays and deductibles for preventive services;
    • Eliminating overpayments to Medicare Advantage plans; and
    • Providing seniors with a free annual wellness exam.
  • Reducing both the short-term and the long-term deficit:
    • Resulted in a net deficit reduction of over $100 billion within the first decade.
    • Slowed the growth in long-term health care spending, resulting in over $1 trillion of savings in the second ten years

Repeal turns the clock back on all of this – it increases the deficit, puts insurance companies back in control of Americans’ health care, increases costs and cuts benefits for Medicare seniors, and eliminates $40 billion in tax credits to help make insurance more affordable for small businesses. Members are urged to VOTE NO.

TOMORROW’S OUTLOOK
The GOP Leadership has announced the following schedule for Friday, May 17: The House will meet at 9:00 a.m. for legislative business. The House is expected to consider H.R. 1062 – SEC Regulatory Accountability Act (Rep. Garrett – Financial Services) (Subject to a Rule).

 
The Daily Quote

“The 37th time won’t be the charm. But House Republicans are charging forward anyway this week on a vote to repeal President Obama’s signature health care overhaul…. Three dozen is a lot for a bill that currently has no prayer of becoming law. But the figure 37 actually understates the amount of time Republicans have devoted to litigating and trying to dismantle the president’s biggest legislative accomplishment…. The repeal vote, which is likely to occur Thursday, will be at least the 43rd day since Republicans took over the House that they have devoted time to voting on the issue. To put that in perspective, they have held votes on only 281 days since taking power in January 2011…. That means that since 2011, Republicans have spent no less than 15 percent of their time on the House floor on repeal in some way.”

-    New York Times, 5/14/13