THE DAILY WHIP: MONDAY, JULY 14, 2014

For Immediate Release:

July 14, 2014

Contact:

Stephanie Young, Mariel Saez 202-225-3130

House Meets At: First Vote Predicted: Last Vote Predicted:

12:00 p.m.: Morning Hour
2:00 p.m.: Legislative Business

Unlimited “One Minutes”

6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

**Following one minute speeches, the House is expected to recess until approximately 3:00 p.m. At that time, the House will reconvene and consider the twenty bills listed for consideration under suspension of the Rules. Any recorded votes requested will be postponed until 6:30 p.m.

**Members are advised that following last votes, the House is expected to consider general debate and begin consideration of amendments to H.R. 5016.

Suspensions (20 bills)

  1. H.R. 5031 – The STEM Education Act (Rep. Smith (TX) – Science, Space, and Technology)
  2. H.R. 1786 – The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2014 (Rep. Neugebauer – Science, Space, and Technology)
  3. H.R. 5035 – To reauthorize the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and for other purposes (Rep. Buchson – Science, Space, and Technology)
  4. H.R. 5056 – The Research and Development Efficiency Act (Rep. Buchson – Science, Space, and Technology)
  5. H.R. 5029 – The International Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 2014 (Rep. Lipinski – Science, Space, and Technology)
  6. H.R. 4185 – The District of Columbia Courts, Public Defender Service, and Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency Act (Rep. Norton – Oversight and Government Reform)
  7. H.R. 451 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 500 North Brevard Avenue in Cocoa Beach, Florida, as the "Richard K. Salick Post Office" (Rep. Posey – Oversight and Government Reform)
  8. H.R. 606 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 815 County Road 23 in Tyrone, New York, as the "Specialist Christopher Scott Post Office Building" (Rep. Reed – Oversight and Government Reform)
  9. H.R. 2223 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 220 Elm Avenue in Munising, Michigan, as the "Elizabeth L. Kinnunen Post Office Building" (Rep. Benishek – Oversight and Government Reform)
  10. H.R. 3534 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 113 West Michigan Avenue in Jackson, Michigan, as the "Officer James Bonneau Memorial Post Office" (Rep. Walberg – Oversight and Government Reform)
  11. H.R. 2802 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 418 Liberty Street in Covington, Indiana, as the "Fountain County Veterans Memorial Post Office" (Rep. Rokita – Oversight and Government Reform)
  12. H.R. 4355 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 201 B Street in Perryville, Arkansas, as the "Harold George Bennett Post Office" (Rep. Griffin – Oversight and Government Reform)
  13. H.R. 3027 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 442 Miller Valley Road in Prescott, Arizona, as the "Barry M. Goldwater Post Office" (Rep. Gosar – Oversight and Government Reform)
  14. H.R. 2291 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 450 Lexington Avenue in New York, New York, as the "Vincent R. Sombrotto Post Office" (Rep. Carolyn Maloney – Oversight and Government Reform)
  15. H.R. 3085 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 3349 West 111th Street in Chicago, Illinois, as the "Captain Herbert Johnson Memorial Post Office Building" (Rep. Lipinski – Oversight and Government Reform)
  16. H.R. 4416 – To redesignate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 161 Live Oak Street in Miami, Arizona, as the "Staff Sergeant Manuel V. Mendoza Post Office Building" (Rep. Kirkpatrick – Oversight and Government Reform)
  17. H.R. 4193 – The Smart Savings Act, as amended (Rep. Issa – Oversight and Government Reform)
  18. H.R. 4195 – The Federal Register Modernization Act (Rep. Issa – Oversight and Government Reform)
  19. H.R. 4197 – The All Circuit Review Extension Act (Rep. Cummings – Oversight and Government Reform)
  20. H.R. 1192 – To redesignate Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National Park as “Mount Jessie Benton Fre’mont” (Rep. McClintock – Natural Resources)

Begin Consideration of H.R. 5016 – Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2015 (Rep. Crenshaw – Appropriations) (One Hour of Debate). H.R. 5016 appropriates $21.3 billion in FY 2015 discretionary budget authority for the Treasury Department (including the IRS); the federal judiciary; and executive agencies such as the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), General Services Administration (GSA), Small Business Administration (SBA), Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) – a decrease of approximately $566 million (3%) from FY 2014, and $2.3 billion below the President’s request.

The measure contains deep cuts to a number of critical programs – including a cut to the IRS of over $340 million below current funding levels – which would force the IRS to operate with as many as 9,500 fewer employees. The IRS estimates this would lead to as much as $2 billion in uncollected tax revenue. The bill also funds the SEC at $300 million below the President’s request – specifically aimed at hindering the enforcement and further implementation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act. The bill would also eliminate all funding for the Election Assistance Commission (EAC).

In addition to severe cuts, the measure contains a number of controversial policy riders, including provisions preventing the implementation of the Affordable Care Act’s individual responsibility and reproductive services coverage. The measure would require the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to become subject to the annual appropriations process.  It would also amend the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act’s “push-out provision,” expanding the permissible types of swap activities that can be conducted directly by insured financial institutions without losing their access to federal assistance.

Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the $1.014 trillion discretionary spending cap and the 302(a) discretionary allocations agreed to in the Bipartisan Budget Agreement. By setting the Appropriations Committee's allocation in-line with the Bipartisan Budget Agreement, House Republicans were able to begin the appropriations process early. However, House Republicans have chosen to focus on inserting controversial policy riders into several appropriations bills, slowing down the process and jeopardizing enactment of all twelve appropriations bills before the start of the 2015 fiscal year.

The Rule, which was adopted last week, provides for one hour of general debate and makes in order any amendment offered that complies with the House Rules. Additionally, the Rule provides for 10 minutes of debate per amendment equally divided between the proponent and an opponent and up to 10 pro forma amendments for the purpose of debate offered by the Chair and Ranking Member or their designee. Members are urged to VOTE NO.

Bill Text for H.R. 5016:
PDF Version

Background for H.R. 5016:
House Report (HTML Version)
House Report (PDF Version)

TOMORROW’S OUTLOOK
The GOP Leadership has announced the following schedule for Tuesday, July 15: The House will meet at 12:00 p.m. for legislative business. The House is expected to continue consideration of H.R. 5016 – Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2015 (Rep. Crenshaw – Appropriations). The House is also expected to consider H.R. 5021 – Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014 (Rep. Camp – Transportation and Infrastructure/Ways and Means/Science, Space, and Technology/Energy and Commerce/Education and the Workforce/Natural Resources) (Subject to a Rule). Additionally, the House is expected to consider H.R. 3086 – Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act (Rep. Goodlatte – Judiciary) – under suspension of the Rules.

 
The Daily Quote

“Capitol Hill’s reputation as the ‘do-nothing Congress’ is well-deserved. The current session of Congress is on track to pass historically fewer laws of substance, according to an analysis by The Hill. In fact, the major bills that have cleared the 113th Congress to date are nearly all 'must-pass' measures or reauthorizations of existing law. Laws of substance under The Hill's analysis are defined as bills that are non-ceremonial and have some tangible impact on policy, even if it is as minor as a land transfer… Out of the 126 laws passed by the 113th Congress so far, only 99 are considered substantive and not related to ceremonial recognitions. By contrast, 144 laws had been enacted at this same point in the last Congress.”

-    The Hill, 7/13/2014