THE DAILY WHIP: FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014

For Immediate Release:

May 30, 2014

Contact:

Stephanie Young, Mariel Saez 202-225-3130

House Meets At: First Vote Predicted: Last Vote Predicted:
9:00 a.m.: Legislative Business

Five “One Minutes”

10:00 – 10:30 a.m. 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

H.Res. 604 – Rule Providing for Consideration of both H.R. 4681 – Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 2014 and 2015 (Rep. Rogers (MI) – Intelligence) and H.R. 4745  Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (Rep. Latham – Appropriations) (One Hour of Debate). The Rules Committee has recommended one Rule which would provide for consideration of two bills.

For H.R. 4681, the Rules Committee has recommended a structured Rule that provides for one hour of general debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. The Rule allows for 11 amendments, debatable for 10 minutes equally divided between the offeror and an opponent.

The Rule also provides the Chairman of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence authority to offer amendments en bloc, consisting of amendments not previously considered. All en bloc amendments are debatable for 20 minutes equally divided between the Chair and Ranking Member of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. The Rule allows one motion to recommit, with or without instructions and waives all points of order against the legislation.

For H.R. 4745, the Rules Committee has recommended an open Rule that allows any amendments that comply with House Rules to be considered. The Rule provides for one hour of general debate, equally divided between the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Appropriations. The Rule allows any Member to submit an amendment under the 5-minute Rule, but allows the Chair to give priority in recognition to those amendments pre-printed in the Congressional Record. It also allows pro forma amendments and one motion to recommit with or without instructions.

H.R. 4681 – Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 2014 and 2015 (Rep. Rogers (MI) – Intelligence) (One Hour of Debate). This bill authorizes appropriations for FY 2014 and FY 2015 for 16 U.S. intelligence agencies, including the CIA, the National Security Agency, and the Defense Intelligence Agency, and it also authorizes funding for specific intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the Federal Government.  Overall funding for FY 2014 is authorized slightly below the President’s request while FY 2015 is authorized about 1% above it. 

The bill makes cuts to less productive programs while increasing funding for certain critically important programs. The bill also makes key oversight improvements, including the establishment of an independent Inspector General for the National Security Agency and requiring the Director of National Intelligence to implement security clearance reforms. 

For questions on the bill, please contact the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence at x57690 to arrange Member access to the classified annex.

A full list of the 11 amendments made in order can be found HERE.

Bill Text for H.R. 4681:
PDF Version

Background for H.R. 4681:
House Report (HTML Version)
House Report (PDF Version)

 
The Daily Quote

“With primary season nearly over, we’re approaching what is undoubtedly the last chance for Congress to act on immigration reform before the midterm elections. For the past two years, no issue has loomed larger over Washington. Because of its importance to the future of the Republican Party and because it’s a rare issue with bipartisan support, gaming out the twists and turns of a possible legislative path for immigration reform has become a Beltway obsession… Last June the Democratic-led Senate passed a hard-fought bipartisan reform bill that would have achieved this goal. But that bill died under pressure from conservatives when it got to the Republican-led House, despite support from a bipartisan majority. Speaker John Boehner, who’s repeatedly said he favors reform, could easily usher it into law by letting the House vote on the bill. A minority of House Republicans would join with almost all Democrats to pass it… The Senate bill will expire when the new Congress is seated in January, so Congress has another seven months to puzzle it out… So Boehner doesn’t have long to act—if he’s still inclined to do so at all.”

-    Bloomberg Businessweek, 5/29/2014