Republican Outrages

Republican Leadership Postpones Tax Relief For Service Men & Women To Protect GOP Special Interest Provisions

For Immediate Release:

March 6, 2003

Contact:Dan Maffei
202/225-3526
Rangel: "Republican leaders have put a few members’ pet provisions before the financial well-being of our troops."

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Excerpts from Newspaper Editorials from Around the Country on Welfare Reform

For Immediate Release:

February 11, 2003

Contact:

California

San Jose Mercury News, January 17, 2003

"This is not the time for the federal government to skimp on welfare programs, or to burden states with additional expenses. If Bush truly wants to help people become and remain independent, protect children and strengthen families, he will soften his approach."

Los Angeles Times, Be Flexible on Welfare Rules, May 18, 2002

"States need flexibility in defining "work" to allow some recipients to attend school, learn English or take training so they can get hired."

Spratt Says President's Budget Most Fiscally Damaging in U.S. History

For Immediate Release:

February 3, 2003

Contact:U.S. Rep. John Spratt

WASHINGTON - U.S. Rep. John Spratt (D-SC) issued the following statement today on the President's Fiscal Year 2004 Budget.

"The $5.6 trillion unified budget surplus projected less than two years ago is gone. In its place, the Administration offers a budget with a $2.1 trillion deficit for the same ten-year period - an $8 trillion fiscal reversal in just two years.

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Bush budget is deja voodoo all over again

For Immediate Release:

February 11, 2003

Contact:Steny Hoyer & Charles Stenholm

The Dallas Morning News

President Bush told the nation in his State of the Union address that "we will not pass along our problems to other Congresses, other presidents and other generations."

But last week, the administration's budget projected a $307 billion deficit for next year and deficits for as far as the eye can see - even as the administration pushes a new $674 billion tax plan and contemplates military action in Iraq that could cost hundreds of billions of dollars more.

For us, it seems like deja "voodoo economics" all over again.

Tax Cuts and Red Ink

For Immediate Release:

February 4, 2003

Contact:Kent Conrad and John Spratt

The Washington Post

When President Bush took office, his budget officials estimated the cumulative surplus for the years 2002-11 to be $5.6 trillion. Last week the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its outlook for the next 10 years, in which it declared that the cumulative surplus for that 10-year period "has been all but eliminated." And that's before the president's proposed tax cuts or spending initiatives are factored into the budget.

Hoyer on the President's 2004 Budget: "The Fiscal Frankenstein Returns with a Vengeance"

For Immediate Release:

February 3, 2003

Contact:Stacey Farnen
(202) 225 - 3130

WASHINGTON - House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (MD) released the following statement today regarding the Fiscal Year 2004 Budget released by the Bush Administration today:

"One week after telling the American people that 'we will not pass along our problems to other Congresses, other presidents, and other generations,' the President has released a budget for Fiscal Year 2004 that does precisely that. Budget deficits - the fiscal Frankenstein that shackles economic growth - are back with a vengeance.

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Congressman Hoyer Delivers Democratic Response to the President's Radio Address

For Immediate Release:

November 16, 2002

Contact:Stacey Farnen
(202) 225 - 3130

WASHINGTON - Congressman Steny H. Hoyer (D-MD), who became Maryland's highest ranking Member of Congress ever when he was unanimously elected to be the next House Democratic Whip on Thursday, will deliver the Democratic response to the President's weekly national radio address on Saturday. The following is the text of Congressman Hoyer's remarks, as delivered:

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Hoyer on Passing the Health Care Bill on MSNBC

We're going to finish the job that we started. We had a big victory. Set the Health Care Bill to the President for signature. He's going to sign it tomorrow morning and we're going to finish the bill with the amendments called the reconciliation, reconciling the differences between the House and the Senate. And when they pass that and send it to the President, that will be the law. If they make some changes we'll certainly be ready to receive them and consider them...

Health Care Reform in Congress on CBS

We needed to provide access to affordable health care for all Americans and all families. That is the single best selling point because if we don't do that, the system is more expensive, less efficient, our nation is less healthy, and all Americans who have insurance are paying about $1,000 extra in their policies to accomplish that objective...