Congress

Light Duty?

Hoyer Says This Congress On Path for Record Books

For Immediate Release:

July 22, 2004

Contact:Allison Stevens

Congressional Quarterly

Could it be that House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., secretly wants a lame-duck session?

His staff counted up how long the House has been in session so far this year and all of last year. To that, they added the 17 legislative days scheduled through the Oct. 1 target adjournment. Grand total: a “shocking” (Hoyer’s word) 231.

If that holds, it will be the smallest number of workdays since the 84th Congress concluded its 230 session days in 1956, according to the book Vital Statistics on Congress.

 

Posted in

Session called unproductive

Analysts say a closely divided Congress has been held up by infighting, election tensions

For Immediate Release:

July 25, 2004

Contact:GIL KLEIN

MEDIA GENERAL NEWS SERVICE

WASHINGTON - Congress, departing for its summer recess, left behind few achievements and a backlog of business to accomplish this fall amid election rancor, political analysts said.

"Even a deal on a tax cut is proving elusive," said Stan Collender, an independent federal budget analyst with Financial Dynamics. "If in an election year Congress is having trouble passing a tax cut, what else do you need to know?"

Posted in

Hoyer Says Political Trends Moving House Dems' Way

For Immediate Release:

July 22, 2004

Contact:Staff

CongressDaily

House Minority Whip Hoyer said Wednesday that positive generic
polling numbers, promising Democratic candidates and an
unproductive Republican-controlled Congress would boost
Democratic chances of taking the House.

   In a political briefing with reporters, Hoyer said national
polls have recently shown congressional Democrats with an
advantage of between 6 and 8 percentage points.

Posted in

Hoyer says Democrats could take back the House

For Immediate Release:

July 22, 2004

Contact:Hans Nichols

The Hill

House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) is grounding his claim that Democrats “are in striking distance” of taking back the House with a heavy statistical comparison to the Republican watershed election of 1994.

Relying on “generic ballot” polling data from both years, Hoyer argued that his party is in a better position than Newt Gingrich and his troops were in July 1994, on their way to winning a net gain of 52 seats in November.

Democrats need to overcome an 11-seat deficit to return their party to majority status.

Posted in

Democrats Set to Assail Do-Nothing GOP Congress

For Immediate Release:

July 20, 2004

Contact:Emily Pierce

Roll Call

With the Democratic National Convention just a week away, the mood of Congressional Democrats heading into their all-important political rally verges on the smug.

Democrats, often with the help of a few centrist Republicans, have outmaneuvered GOP leaders this year on a series of votes on Republican and White House legislative priorities. These include recent high-profile losses on issues involving gay marriage and the GOP’s “tort reform” agenda in the Senate, and a near-loss on Patriot Act rulemaking in the House.

Posted in

Hoyer balances demands of constituents, Capitol Hill

For Immediate Release:

July 22, 2004

Contact:Sonsyrea Tate

Maryland Gazette

U.S. Rep. Steny Hoyer has a lot of ground to cover on any given day.

Hoyer's district includes parts of Prince George's, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's counties. He stays busy with appearances in his district and his duties as House Democratic minority whip, leading his colleagues through strategy sessions on national issues.

Hoyer Continues His Criticism Of GOP Majority's Stewardship

For Immediate Release:

July 14, 2004

Contact:Susan Davis

Congress Daily

House Minority Whip Hoyer criticized GOP leaders Tuesday for
what he called an "abuse of power" for holding floor votes open
until the majority position prevails. Hoyer cited five votes
during the 108th Congress, including the nearly three-hour
Medicare prescription drug bill vote and a recent defeat of an
amendment that would have repealed a provision of the USA
PATRIOT Act, as egregious examples.

Budget Vote Leaves Some Grumbling

For Immediate Release:

June 28, 2004

Contact:Ben Pershing

Roll Call

House Republicans endured a rare legislative setback last week, as dozens of their own Members voted with Democrats to kill a budget enforcement measure that some GOP leaders were reluctant to bring to the floor in the first place.

The bill, which was sponsored by Budget Chairman Jim Nussle (R-Iowa), failed on a 268-146 tally after 72 Republicans joined 195 Democrats and one Independent in voting no.

Budget Impasse Reflects GOP Schism

Tax Cutters in Standoff With Advocates of Fiscal Restraint

For Immediate Release:

June 30, 2004

Contact:Jonathan Weisman

The Washington Post

A deep rift in the Republican Party has left Congress unable to pass a budget this year, raising the probability that, for the third time in three decades, lawmakers will not agree on a detailed blueprint for government spending and tax policy.

Political Drama in US Congress Points to Increasing Partisan Discord in Washington

For Immediate Release:

July 9, 2004

Contact:Dan Robinson

Voice of America

An extraordinary political drama played out this past week in the U.S. House of Representatives as Democratic and Republican lawmakers feuded over a proposal aimed at watering down part of a key law passed after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
The spectacle, which provided a glimpse into the mechanics of politics on Capitol Hill, came as Congress works to complete unfinished business before a long summer recess.