2013 GOP-led House of Representatives Digital Calendar Year-in-Review

The Least Productive Year in Modern History

Under Republican leadership, 2013 is on track to be the least productive year for the House of Representatives in modern history.  Only 57 bills have been enacted into law, the least for any year since at least 1947, when record collection began.  48 of those 57 bills were non-controversial measures that passed the House on suspension, by voice vote, or by unanimous consent.  Of the nine bills that became law after full consideration in the House, which are highlighted in yellow on the calendar below, five of them passed only thanks to significant support from Democratic members.

As shown in the calendar below, Republicans spent the vast majority of this year passing extreme, partisan bills that attack working Americans, gut environmental protections, retreat on education, shut down the government, and repeatedly attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act.  There are critical issues that the House should have addressed this year and didn’t, including job creation and fixing our broken immigration system. 

As 2013 comes to a close, we invite you to look below for a not-too-pleasant trip down memory lane. 

  • Federal holiday
  • Voting day
  • Added Voting Day
  • CANCELED VOTES
  • Today

Bolded text is legislation considered by the House. Highlighted bills have been signed into law.

«  

January 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
1
New Year's Day
No Votes
Fiscal Cliff Deal (passed with 172 Ds and 85 Rs)
6 Suspensions
2
No Votes
3
First Votes at Noon
Republican Rules Package for the 113th Congress
Election of the Speaker for the 113th Congress
4
Votes
Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Part 1 - $9.7 billion (passed with 193 Ds and 161 Rs)
5
 
6
 
7
District Work Period
8
District Work Period
9
District Work Period
10
District Work Period
11
District Work Period
12
 
13
 
14
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
1 Suspension
15
Votes
Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Part 2 - $50.6 billion (passed with 192 Ds and 49 Rs)
16
CANCELED VOTES ON 1/13/13. Previously: Last Votes 3:00pm
Republican Retreat
17
Republican Retreat
18
Republican Retreat
19
 
20
 
21
Martin Luther King Day
Inauguration
22
Votes: First vote as early as 1:00pm
1 Suspension
23
Last Votes 3:00pm
Debt Limit Suspension and 'No Budget, No Pay'
24
No Votes
25
No Votes
26
 
27
 
28
District Work Period
29
District Work Period
30
District Work Period
31
District Work Period
 
 
«  

February 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
 
 
 
1
District Work Period
2
 
3
 
4
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
5
Votes
6
Last Votes 3:00pm
Democratic Retreat
Require a PLAN D Act
7
Democratic Retreat
8
Democratic Retreat
9
 
10
 
11
No Votes
12
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
13
Votes
1 Suspension
14
Votes
15
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Attacking Workers 1] Freeze Federal Employee Pay for 3rd Year in a Row Act
1 Suspension
16
 
17
 
18
Presidents' Day
District Work Period
19
District Work Period
20
District Work Period
21
District Work Period
22
District Work Period
23
 
24
 
25
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
1 Suspension
26
Votes
1 Suspension
27
Votes
28
Last Votes 3:00pm
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (passed with 199 Ds and 87 Rs)
 
 
«  

March 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
 
 
 
1
No Votes
2
 
3
 
4
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
1 Suspension
5
Votes
2 Suspensions
6
Votes
Giving Up On All FY2013 Appropriations Except Defense, Military Construction and Veterans
7
CANCELED VOTES ON 3/5/13. Previously: Last Votes 3:00pm
8
No Votes
9
 
10
Daylight Savings Begin
11
No Votes
12
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
2 Suspensions
13
Votes
[Attacking Workers 2] Blocking Flexibility in Welfare-to-Work Programs Act
14
Votes
15
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Attacking Workers 3] Gutting the Workforce Investment Act
16
 
17
St. Patrick's Day
18
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
2 Suspensions
19
Votes
Cut Budgets of House Committees
20
Votes
GOP's Radical, Unworkable FY2014 Budget
21
Last Votes 3:00pm
Senate Amendments FY2013 Appropriations
22
No Votes
23
 
24
 
25
Passover Begins at Sundown
District Work Period
26
District Work Period
27
District Work Period
28
District Work Period
29
District Work Period
Good Friday
30
 
31
Easter
 
 
 
 
 
 
«  

April 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
1
District Work Period
2
Passover Ends at Sundown
District Work Period
3
District Work Period
4
District Work Period
5
District Work Period
6
 
7
 
8
No Votes
9
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
10
Votes
Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development Act
11
Votes
12
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Attacking Workers 4] Shutting Down the National Labor Relations Board Act
13
 
14
 
15
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
4 Suspensions
16
Votes
3 Suspensions
17
Votes
18
Last Votes 3:00pm
Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act
19
No Votes
20
 
21
 
22
No Votes
23
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
2 Suspensions
24
Votes
2 Suspensions
Cantorcare (PULLED FROM FLOOR AT LAST MINUTE)
25
Votes
26
Last Votes 3:00pm
Helium Stewardship Act
27
 
28
 
29
District Work Period
30
District Work Period
 
 
 
 
«  

May 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
 
1
District Work Period
2
District Work Period
3
District Work Period
4
 
5
 
6
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
7
Votes
8
Votes
[Attacking Workers 5] Ending Workers' Right to Overtime Pay Act
9
Last Votes 3:00pm
Pay China First Act
10
No Votes
11
 
12
Mother's Day
13
No Votes
14
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
15
Votes
5 Suspensions
16
Votes
[37th ACA Repeal] Full Repeal of the Affordable Care Act
17
Last Votes 3:00pm
Hamstring the SEC Act
18
 
19
 
20
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
2 Suspensions
21
Votes
6 Suspensions
22
Votes
[Harming Environment 1] Ignore Environmental Impacts of the Keystone Pipeline Act
23
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Limiting Education 1] Making College More Expensive Act
24
No Votes
25
 
26
 
27
Memorial Day
District Work Period
28
District Work Period
29
District Work Period
30
District Work Period
31
District Work Period
 
«  

June 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
5 Suspensions
4
Votes
[1st of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Military Construction and Veterans Affairs
1 Suspension
5
Votes
6
Last Votes 3:00pm
[2nd of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Homeland Security
7
No Votes
8
 
9
 
10
No Votes
11
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
5 Suspensions
12
Votes
4 Suspensions
Swap Jurisdiction Certainty Act
13
Votes
14
Last Votes 3:00pm
Flag Day
FY2014 National Defense Authorization Act
15
 
16
Father's Day
17
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
6 Suspensions
18
Votes
3 Suspensions
Criminalize Abortions After 20 Weeks Act
19
Votes
20
Last Votes 3:00pm
Farm Bill - End Nutrition Assistance for 2 Million Americans (FAILED ON HOUSE FLOOR)
21
No Votes
22
 
23
 
24
No Votes
25
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
26
Votes
1 Suspension
27
Votes
Outer Continental Shelf Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreements Authorization Act
28
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Harming Environment 2] Open our Coasts to Oil and Gas Drilling Act
29
 
30
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
«  

July 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
1
District Work Period
2
District Work Period
3
District Work Period
4
Independence Day
District Work Period
5
District Work Period
6
 
7
 
8
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
9
Votes
10
Votes
[3rd of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Energy and Water
11
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Farm Bill Do-Over Part 1] Agriculture Subsidies Without Nutrition Assistance
12
No Votes
13
 
14
 
15
No Votes
16
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
17
Votes
[38th ACA Repeal] Employer Responsibility
[39th ACA Repeal] Individual Responsibility
18
Votes
19
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Limiting Education 2] Letting Students Down Act
20
 
21
 
22
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
6 Suspensions
23
Votes
24
Votes
[4th of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Defense
25
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Harming Environment 3] Exempt Coal Ash from Federal Regulations Act
26
No Votes
27
 
28
 
29
No Votes
30
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
31
Votes
13 Suspensions
[5th of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Transportation, Housing, Urban Development (PULLED FROM FLOOR AT LAST MINUTE)
 
 
 
«  

August 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
 
 
1
Votes
[Harming Environment 4] Block Regulations That Protect Public Health and the Environment Act
[Attacking Workers 5] Block Any Federal Employees From Getting Bonuses Act
2
Last Votes 3:00pm
[40th ACA Repeal] Hamstring the IRS
Block the President and Agencies From Doing Anything
3
 
4
 
5
District Work Period
6
District Work Period
7
District Work Period
8
District Work Period
9
District Work Period
10
 
11
 
12
District Work Period
13
District Work Period
14
District Work Period
15
District Work Period
16
District Work Period
17
 
18
 
19
District Work Period
20
District Work Period
21
District Work Period
22
District Work Period
23
District Work Period
24
 
25
 
26
District Work Period
27
District Work Period
28
District Work Period
29
District Work Period
30
District Work Period
31
 
«  

September 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1
 
2
Labor Day
District Work Period
3
District Work Period
4
Rosh Hashanah begins at Sundown
District Work Period
5
District Work Period
Rosh Hashanah
6
District Work Period
Rosh Hashanah
7
 
8
 
9
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
2 Suspensions
10
Votes
8 Suspensions
11
Votes
12
Last Votes 3:00pm
[41st ACA Repeal] Requiring Redundant Subsidy Verification
13
No Votes
Yom Kippur begins at Sundown
14
Yom Kippur
15
 
16
No Votes
17
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
5 Suspensions
18
Votes
[Harming Environment 5] Exempt Mining Operations from Environmental Review Act
19
Votes
[Farm Bill Do-Over Part 2] Massive Cuts to Nutrition Assistance
20
Last Votes 3:00pm
[1st Shutdown Vote] [42nd ACA Repeal] Continue Sequestration, Defund ACA
[Harming Environment 6] Cutting Down Trees in National Forests
21
 
22
 
23
District Work Period
24
District Work Period
25
ADDED ON 9/20/13: Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
4 Suspensions
26
ADDED ON 9/20/13: Votes
Transfer Federal Lands to a Mining Company for Development Act (PULLED FROM FLOOR AT LAST MINUTE)
27
ADDED ON 9/20/13: Votes
4 Suspensions
28
ADDED ON 9/26/13: Votes
[2nd Shutdown Vote] [43rd ACA Repeal] Medical Device Tax
[3rd Shutdown Vote] [44th ACA Repeal] One Year Delay of ACA
2 Suspensions
Exempting Military Pay from the Government Shutdown
29
 
30
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
[4th Shutdown Vote] [45th ACA Repeal] One Year Delay of Individual Responsibility, Plus Ending Contribution For Members and Staff
2 Suspensions
 
 
 
 
 
«  

October 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
1
Votes
3 Suspensions
2
Votes
[5th Shutdown Vote] Exempting National Parks and Museums
[6th Shutdown Vote] Exempting the District of Columbia
[7th Shutdown Vote] Exempting NIH
3
Last Votes 3:00pm
10 Suspensions
[8th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Veterans
[9th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Reserves and National Guard
4
ADDED ON 10/3/13: Votes
[11th Shutdown Vote] Exempting WIC
[10th Shutdown Vote] Exempting FEMA
5
ADDED ON 10/4/13: Votes
1 Suspension
Retroactive Pay for Federal Workers
6
 
7
ADDED ON 10/4/13: Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
[12th Shutdown Vote] Exempting FDA
8
Votes
[13th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Headstart
[14th Shutdown Vote] Exempting FAA
9
Votes
1 Suspension
[15th Shutdown Vote] Not-So-Super Committee That Can Only Cut Spending and Entitlements
10
Votes
[16th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Border Programs
11
Last Votes 3:00pm
[17th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Nuclear Programs
12
ADDED ON 10/9/2013: Votes
13
 
14
Columbus Day
ADDED ON 10/10/13: Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
[18th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Native American Programs
15
ADDED ON 10/10/13: Votes
[19th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Impact Aid
16
ADDED ON 10/10/13: Votes
End the Government Shutdown and Raise the Debt Limit (passed with 198 Ds and 87 Rs)
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
No Votes
22
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
23
Votes
Water Resources Reform and Development Act
24
CANCELED VOTES ON 10/21/13. Previously: Votes
25
CANCELED VOTES ON 10/16/13. Previously: Last Votes 3:00pm
26
 
27
 
28
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
6 Suspensions
29
Votes
Prevent Labor Department from Regulating Broker Dealers
4 Suspensions
Republicans Complaining About Paying Our Bills
30
Votes
Swaps Regulatory Improvement Act
31
No Votes
 
 
«  

November 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 
 
 
 
 
1
No Votes
2
 
3
Daylight Savings Time Ends
4
District Work Period
5
District Work Period
6
District Work Period
7
District Work Period
8
District Work Period
9
 
10
 
11
Veterans Day
No Votes
12
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
6 Suspensions
13
Votes
Helping Those Responsible for Asbestos Injuries and Harming Victims
14
Votes
Blocking a Judge's Use of Discretion Act
15
Last Votes 3:00pm
[46th ACA Repeal] Permanently Extending Inadequate Individual Plans
16
 
17
 
18
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
5 Suspensions
19
Votes
1 Suspension
20
Votes
[Harming Environment 7] More Oil and Gas Drilling on Federal Lands Act
[Harming Environment 8] Block Federal Regulation of Natural Gas Fracking Practices
21
Last Votes 3:00pm
[Harming Environment 9] Unnecessarily Rush Natural Gas Pipeline Siting Act
22
No Votes
23
 
24
 
25
District Work Period
26
District Work Period
27
Hanukkah begins at Sundown
District Work Period
28
Thanksgiving Day
District Work Period
29
District Work Period
30
 
«  

December 2013

  »
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
1
 
2
Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
3
Votes
4
Votes
Exempting Some Hedge Fund Managers from Dodd-Frank Regulations
5
Last Votes 3:00pm
Innovation Act to Combat Patent Trolls
6
No Votes
7
 
8
 
9
CHANGED TO "LEGISLATIVE DAY BUT VOTES POSTPONED" ON 12/2/13. Previously: No Votes
1 Suspension
10
CHANGED TO "VOTES AFTER 2PM" ON 10/2/13, Previously: Votes Postponed until 6:30pm
3 Suspensions
11
Votes
5 Suspensions
12
Votes
4 Suspensions
Bipartisan Budget Deal and SGR Patch
13
CANCELED VOTES ON 12/12/13. Previously: Last Votes 3:00pm
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
Christmas Day
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
New Year's Eve
 
 
 
 

- 6 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 8 - Fiscal Cliff Deal (passed with 172 Ds and 85 Rs)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- Election of the Speaker for the 113th Congress

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.Res. 5 - Republican Rules Package for the 113th Congress

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The Rules for the 113th Congress will be brought up as a privileged resolution with no amendments permitted. The Republican Rules package contains 5 separate sections. Section 1 adopts the Rules of the 112th Congress with the amendments listed in sections two through four, including: changes to the Code of Conduct and the Committee on Ethics, eliminating provisions contained in the Affordable Care Act that limit the ability of the House to determine consideration of recommendations from the Independent Payment Advisory Board, allows the House to continue to be a defendant in the DOMA cases being litigated around the country and allows the new House to continue litigation to enforce a subpoena against the Attorney General related to the “Fast and Furious” investigation. It also restricts the ability of the Delegates and Resident commissioner to cast votes, or preside, in the Committee of the Whole House.

The Rules Package for the 113th Congress contains several provisions from the 112th Congress related to budget enforcement. It provides for the Chairman of the Budget Committee to set budget aggregates and allocations at the Ryan FY13 Budget levels until a new FY14 Budget is adopted. This essentially deems the Ryan Budget Resolution as governing for purposes of allocations of spending authority until the House adopts a new Budget. The Package also enforces “spending reduction accounts” in appropriations bills so that if spending cuts are adopted during the appropriations amendment process and purported to count towards spending reduction, the money cannot be spent elsewhere during consideration of the bill. In addition, The GOP Rules Package exempts various tax cuts and the repeal of the Affordable Care Act from the “Pay-as-you-go Rule.” This would allow Republicans to repeal the bill without accounting for the impact on the deficit.

Finally, Section 5 of the Rules Package provides for the reading of the Constitution on the legislative day of January 15, 2013.

H.R. 41 - Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Part 1 - $9.7 billion (passed with 193 Ds and 161 Rs)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would provide the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) with an additional $9.7 billion in emergency borrowing authority to carry out the National Flood Insurance Program in response to Hurricane Sandy. Borrowing authority for the National Flood Insurance Program is currently capped at $20.725 billion. These additional funds will allow FEMA to pay flood insurance claims.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 152 - Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Part 2 - $50.6 billion (passed with 192 Ds and 49 Rs)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Last month, the Administration requested $60.4 billion in federal aid to provide financial assistance to homeowners and businesses affected by Hurricane Sandy, rebuild areas impacted by the storm and mitigate future storm damage. On December 28th, the Senate approved this aid package by a vote of 62-32, but the House adjourned the 112th Congress without considering the bill. On January 4th, the House passed H.R. 41 to enact a small portion of the Administration’s $60.4 billion request by providing the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) with $9.7 billion in emergency borrowing authority to carry out the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The House will now consider H.R. 152 to provide additional emergency funding to respond to Hurricane Sandy. H.R. 152 provides $17 billion in emergency funding to several federal agencies. These funds will allow agencies to address a portion of the needs of the victims and communities affected by Hurricane Sandy. The bill includes: $5.4 billion for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund (DRF), which will fulfill the remaining balance for the DRF and fully funds the Administration’s request for that program $5.4 billion for the Department of Transportation’s Federal Transit Authority Emergency Relief Program, which will aid recovery for the four major affected transit agencies: New York’s MTA, the Port Authority of NY/NJ, New Jersey Transit, and the City of New York DOT Ferries and, $3.9 billion through HUD’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program to support community needs, such as repairs to damage caused to publicly owned hospitals, local roads and utilities and small businesses Rep. Rogers (KY) Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute. This amendment is very similar to the text of the base bill, H.R. 152. Including this amendment in the Nature of a Substitute would allow some Republicans to be able to vote for $17 billion in hurricane relief funds, without voting for any additional funding on top of $17 billion Rep. Mulvaney Amendment #4 to Rogers. Provides an offset of the $17 billion in emergency funding to address immediate needs for victims and communities affected by Hurricane Sandy. The offset is achieved by an across the board cut of 1.63 percent to all discretionary appropriations for fiscal year 2013 Rep. Frelinghuysen Amendment. Would provide an additional $33.4 billion for disaster relief for those affected by Hurricane Sandy. It includes funding for longer-term recovery efforts and infrastructure improvements. The $33.4 billion provided in this amendment covers both current and anticipated funding needs in the wake of Hurricane Sandy Rep. Flores Amendment to Frelinghuysen. Strikes $150 million for Regional Ocean Partnership grants Rep. Runyan Amendment to Frelinghuysen. Clarifies that the fisheries disaster money in the Frelinghuysen amendment is intended for states that were BOTH impacted by Hurricane Sandy and suffered a fisheries disaster in 2012 Rep. Broun Amendment to Frelinghuysen. Strikes $13 million from the bill for the National Weather Service ground readiness project Rep. Duncan Amendment to Frelinghuysen. Strikes $1 million in the bill for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC) and replaces that with a limitation against funding for LSC Rep. Campbell/Rep. Blumenauer Amendment to Frelinghuysen. Clarifies that Corps of Engineers construction projects receiving funds in this legislation will be at full Federal expense only receive 100 percent federal funding for the repairs paid for in this bill Rep. Velazquez Amendment #56 to Frelinghuysen. Increases the Community Development Fund appropriation amount by $25 million offset by reductions elsewhere in the bill Rep. Huelskamp Amendment to Frelinghuysen. Requires FEMA to disclose all disaster relief grants, not just those over $1 million Rep. Fleming to Frelinghuysen. Strikes $9.8 million from the Fish & Wildlife Service for rebuilding seawalls and buildings in the Steward McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in Connecticut Rep. Benishek to Frelinghuysen. The underlying Frelinghuysen amendment includes language that waives the local cost share (which is a minimum of 20 percent) for Historic Preservation Grants. The amendment strikes that waiver, and requires a local cost share match Rep. Bishop (UT) to Frelinghuysen. Prohibits the Secretaries of the Interior or Agriculture from acquiring any more federal land using funds provided under the bill Rep. Velazquez Amendment #54 to Frelinghuysen. Increases the funding to the National Cemetery Administration by $1 million for the purposes of repairing veterans' cemeteries damaged by Hurricane Sandy

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 325 - Debt Limit Suspension and 'No Budget, No Pay'

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This measure would suspend the debt limit through May 18, 2013 and provide for an automatic increase in the current $16.4 trillion limit to accommodate borrowing incurred up to that date. The Treasury Department hit the limit of its borrowing authority at the end of December and is currently using "extraordinary measures" to finance government operations — but needs an increase in its borrowing authority by mid- to late-February to avoid default. The bill would also suspend the payment of salaries to Members in either chamber that does not adopt a FY 2014 budget resolution by April 15. The salaries would be held in escrow until a budget resolution is adopted, or until the 113th Congress ends on Jan. 3, 2015.

This bill is not a serious proposal by House Republicans. It is yet another gimmick that does not provide certainty to the business community, international markets, or job creators that the United States will pay its bills. This legislation will simply set up another GOP-manufactured crisis in four months, putting the economy and the creditworthiness of our nation at risk.

Instead of continuing to play games with our economy, Republicans should work with Democrats to ensure our nation does not default on its obligations while working on a big, balanced solution to our deficits.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 444 - Require a PLAN D Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill requires the president, if his original FY 2014 Budget fails to show balance in any year covered by the budget, typically ten years, to submit a supplemental budget. This second budget submission, due by April 1, has the additional requirements of reporting the first year the budget would return to surplus and what new changes are being made.

Along with the normal outlay and revenue information required to be included in annual budgets, the supplemental budget must include an estimate of the earliest fiscal year in which no deficit would occur and a detailed description of the additional policies that would have to be implemented to achieve a balanced budget. It also must include an explanation of the differences between the president's original FY 2014 budget and the supplemental budget.

The Rule makes in order 5 amendments, each debatable for 10 minutes, equally divided between the offeror and an opponent. The amendments are:

Rep. Takano Amendment. Makes changes to the findings section, clarifying that Congress holds responsibility for passing budgets and appropriating funds that allowed the current level of debt
Reps. Schrader/Wolf/Cooper/Gibson Amendment. Adds findings stating the Simpson-Bowles Commission recommended a balanced package of revenue and spending reforms which should form the basis for the President’s supplemental budget
Rep. Fleming Amendment. Requires the President’s supplemental budget to evaluate duplicative agencies and include proposals to consolidate them for cost savings
Rep. Messer Amendment. Requires the President’s supplemental budget to include the cost, per taxpayer, of the annual deficit for each year in which it projects one
Rep. Scalise Amendment. Mirrors the House-passed Rules package by requiring the President's supplemental budget to include new subcategories for mandatory programs that are “Means-Tested Direct Spending” and “Nonmeans-Tested Direct Spending,” and supply information on such programs including average growth and reforms

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 273 - [Attacking Workers 1] Freeze Federal Employee Pay for 3rd Year in a Row Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would freeze federal employees’ salaries for the third consecutive year. It also would also extend the Member pay freeze that was signed into law as part of the “fiscal cliff” legislation by 3 months, through the end of the calendar year. Already, middle-class federal workers have contributed $103 billion toward deficit reduction through pay freezes and changes to retirement benefits. House Republicans once again will ask federal employees to give up their hard-earned pay because Congress cannot reach a balanced solution to reduce our deficit. Moreover, as of January 1, newly hired employees will take home 2.3% less in compensation compared to federal employees hired before the new year as a result of a change that was enacted to the federal pension system last winter. This change will yield an additional $15 billion in deficit reduction over ten years. The House has only been in session for 12 legislative days so far this year and has failed to address the looming sequester and other critical issues facing our nation. This bill is more of the same time-wasting, short-sighted, and counterproductive campaign against federal employees that we saw last Congress.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

S.47 - Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (passed with 199 Ds and 87 Rs)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Since 1994, the Violence Against Women Act has given domestic violence service providers, law enforcement, and federal, state and local government the tools necessary to assist and help protect countless victims of sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking. Earlier this month, the Senate passed S. 47 by a margin of 78-22 with strong bipartisan support from every Democratic Senator and a majority of Senate Republicans including all of the Senate GOP women. This measure addresses a number of concerns for LGBT, Native American and immigrant victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. The measure includes language to ensure the availability of services to all victims of domestic and dating violence, no matter their sexual orientation or gender identity. The measure also provides authority to Native American tribes to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators for a narrow set of crimes related to domestic, dating violence and violations of protecting orders. The Senate measure also adds stalking to the list of crimes for which victims can receive protection through the U-Visa program. Finally, the Senate measure also includes authorizations for programs preventing human trafficking, sexual assault on college campuses, as well as additional resources to address rape kit backlogs.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 933 - Giving Up On All FY2013 Appropriations Except Defense, Military Construction and Veterans

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 933 funds government operations through the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 2013. The bill contains both a full-year FY13 Defense Appropriations bill and a full-year FY13 Military Construction-Veteran Affairs Appropriations bill. It extends funding for all other government agencies without such adjustment through an extension of the current Continuing Resolution of FY12 policy in effect through March 27. The further stipulation that sequestration will apply affirms that all federal agencies funded by the bill, including The Pentagon, will face its cuts. This means that the topline discretionary funding rate within the legislation is $984 billion – the level required by sequestration and $59 billion below the Budget Control Act's agreed upon $1,043 billion level. Although the measure includes full Appropriations bills for Defense and MilCon-VA, updating only these agencies for FY13 realities, it fails to update the remaining 10 Appropriations bills in the same manner. By embracing sequestration, the bill hinders the government's ability to protect consumers, invest in education, and implement critical domestic priorities such as access to affordable health care. As our economy continues to recover, Congress must remain focused on supporting sustained growth and job creation and work together to find a balanced solution to replace sequestration.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 890 - [Attacking Workers 2] Blocking Flexibility in Welfare-to-Work Programs Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill prohibits the Secretary of HHS from using longstanding authority to issue waivers allowing states to conduct demonstration projects under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. It also reauthorizes the TANF program through December 31, 2013. As a condition of receiving federal TANF funding, states are required to document the number of hours that welfare recipients spend in paid jobs, voluntary work or other activities directly related to finding employment. States that fail to meet the requirements may lose a portion of their federal TANF funds. On July 12, 2012, HHS issued a memo outlining conditions under which the Department would provide a limited waiver opportunity giving more flexibility in meeting those requirements to states that develop innovative plans to improve employment outcomes for TANF recipients. Specifically, states would only be granted waivers if they committed to move at least 20% more people from welfare to work compared to their past performance, and they could only keep the waivers if progress was documented within the program’s first year. Both Republican and Democratic governors have requested such flexibility; both Republican and Democratic Administrations have used Section 1115 authority to issue welfare-related waivers in the past. The TANF program's authorization is set to expire on March 27 – it was enacted as part of the current continuing budget resolution. H.R. 933, the full year CR and Defense Appropriations bill passed by the House last week did not include an extension of the TANF program, however the Senate CR currently includes an extension of TANF through September 30, 2013.

H.R. 803 - [Attacking Workers 3] Gutting the Workforce Investment Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 803 would freeze WIA funding for FY2014-2020 while also consolidating or eliminating 35 programs, most of them WIA programs, into state block grants. The bill would also limit the role of organized labor in Workforce Investment Boards. H.R. 803 is partisan legislation that would harm a national WIA system already damaged by years of inadequate and diminishing resources. The bill would freeze WIA program funding for FY2014-2020 (it has already has been cut by half since 2001) and would also consolidate or eliminate 35 programs, most of them WIA programs, into state block grants. That block granting would give states wide discretion to pick and choose eligible groups of participants according to the political and ideological predispositions of their Governors. For 40 years, Democrats and Republicans worked together on job training legislation. This year, Republicans refused to negotiate in drafting the bill, leading to a Democratic walk-out during this year's Education and the Workforce Committee markup of H.R. 803. The bill also changes both the composition and function of Workforce Investment Boards to increase corporate representation in operating the employment and job training system by removing the requirement that a minimum number of the members of state and local boards be selected by organized labor. Using this measure, partisan Republican Governors could halt the appointment of labor members. Ignoring the voice of workers and excluding labor representatives would undermine the accountability of the WIA system and damage its standing in the nation’s public policy discourse. Many of our nation's jobseekers were chronically unemployed long before the last economic recession began and continue to be disproportionally represented in unemployment figures. These include youth, minorities, older workers, persons with disabilities, veterans, and those who lack English proficiency or a high school diploma. This is who the workforce investment system was designed to serve. However, these workers have the most to lose under the Republican bill because Governors and businesses will have an incentive to direct services to those who least need them, rather than helping those who have the greatest needs.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.Res. 115 - Cut Budgets of House Committees

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The resolution sets unacceptably low spending levels for certain House committees in response to sequestration that took effect beginning on March 1, risking the House’s ability to conduct meaningful oversight. The measure authorizes a total of nearly $241 million for the 113th Congress, or $120 million per session. The new amounts cover the period beginning January 3, 2013, and ending January 3, 2015. The new total represents an overall cut of nearly 11% from the second session of the 112th Congress, with some Committees suffering even deeper cuts. This resolution would also add an average of a 23% cut to Committees’ budgets, risking their ability to conduct meaningful oversight, and do their legislative work. In addition, the measure establishes a reserve fund for unanticipated expenses of committees, consisting of any excess between the authorized amounts for committees and the amounts appropriated in the FY 2013 continuing resolution.

H.Con.Res. 25 - GOP's Radical, Unworkable FY2014 Budget

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The Republican Budget submitted by Chairman Paul Ryan cuts non-defense discretionary spending by more than $1 trillion below the level of the 2011 Budget Control Act caps, which already reduced spending to its lowest level as a share of GDP since 1962. It would end the Medicare guarantee and turn it into a voucher program. It would save $810 billion by turning Medicaid into a capped block grant. The Republican Budget also relies on a repeal of the Affordable Care Act, despite the fact that it was upheld by the Supreme Court and withstood over 30 votes on repeal last Congress. The Republican Budget is a combination of the same Romney/Ryan policies that the American people rejected in November and magic asterisks that hide the harsh policies required to make its numbers add up. It not only supports the “meat-ax” approach to reducing spending by cutting below sequestration's level of discretionary spending, but also claims $962 billion in “other mandatory” cuts while giving no specifics on what those cuts are, or what policies are used to implement them. Programs in this “other mandatory” category serve the needy and the disadvantaged, harming the people with the least means while asking nothing of the wealthy. Further, the Republican Budget protects defense spending from sequestration, and then doubles down on sequestration's cuts to nondefense discretionary spending to pay for it. The Republican Budget claims to balance the budget in 10 years, but makes no mention of new revenues. It would create just two tax brackets for individuals – 10% and 25% and a top corporate tax rate of 25% (currently 35%) while claiming to raise trillions of dollars through the elimination of tax preferences – but fails to name even one of them specifically. These tax cuts, along with the Republican Budget’s repeal of the AMT, would result in over $5.7 trillion in lost revenue, and would require raising taxes for the middle class to remain revenue neutral. Despite repealing the Affordable Care Act, the Budget also cynically keeps over $700 billion in Medicare savings – the same savings Chairman Ryan criticized last Fall during the campaign – and the $1 trillion in revenue that comes from the law. The Republican Budget Resolution is very similar to the Budget that Republicans proposed last year and the American people summarily dismissed last Fall. It is once again not a serious document that avoids tough decisions and forces the American people to play ‘fill in the blanks’ with the details. It is an ideological, message document for hard-line conservatives that slashes investments in innovation, education, and infrastructure, which puts our economic recovery at risk and threatens American jobs. It does not reduce the deficit in a responsible way, instead placing the burden of deficit reduction onto seniors, the middle class, working families, and the most vulnerable while refusing to ask the wealthiest among us to contribute. It ends the Medicare guarantee; repeals the Affordable Care Act; harms non-defense discretionary spending immensely, while shielding defense spending from reductions; and achieves deficit reduction on the backs of the middle class and seniors. This Budget rejects a big, bold, and balanced approach to reducing our nation’s deficit.

H.R. 933 - Senate Amendments FY2013 Appropriations

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 933 funds government operations through the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 2013. The bill contains both a full-year FY13 Defense Appropriations bill and a full-year FY13 Military Construction-Veteran Affairs Appropriations bill. It extends funding for all other government agencies without such adjustment through an extension of the current Continuing Resolution of FY12 policy in effect through March 27. The further stipulation that sequestration will apply affirms that all federal agencies funded by the bill, including The Pentagon, will face its cuts. This means that the topline discretionary funding rate within the legislation is $984 billion – the level required by sequestration and $59 billion below the Budget Control Act's agreed upon $1,043 billion level. Although the measure includes full Appropriations bills for Defense and MilCon-VA, updating only these agencies for FY13 realities, it fails to update the remaining 10 Appropriations bills in the same manner. By embracing sequestration, the bill hinders the government's ability to protect consumers, invest in education, and implement critical domestic priorities such as access to affordable health care. As our economy continues to recover, Congress must remain focused on supporting sustained growth and job creation and work together to find a balanced solution to replace sequestration.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 678 - Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill amends the Reclamation Project Act of 1939 to allow private development and private or local management of small conduit hydropower at Bureau of Reclamation facilities. The bill contains a controversial provision that would exempt these small-scale hydropower projects from review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Despite Republicans’ claims, the bill is not a comprehensive jobs plan and will do nothing to put Americans back to work or grow the economy.

H.R. 1120 - [Attacking Workers 4] Shutting Down the National Labor Relations Board Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would prevent the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) from taking most official actions until the Senate confirms new members, the Supreme Court upholds President Obama’s recess appointments, or the first session of the 113th Congress ends. It would also invalidate every action taken since January 2012 that required a quorum. The NLRB plays a critical role in addressing disputes both for workers and for employers, reviewing appeals on unfair labor practice rulings by administrative law judges and petitions for elections made by NLRB regional directors. If this bill were to become law, those appeals could not be heard, decisions could not be enforced, violations of workers’ rights would go unremedied and unpunished, and union elections could not be certified. The bill also threatens to shut down all elections and unfair labor practice proceedings in entire regions of the country, creating significant chaos in workplaces. Because there is no right under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to address disputes directly in a federal court, this bill would deny businesses and workers any meaningful recourse when their NLRA rights are violated. Without a functioning board, wronged workers would have nowhere to turn for the enforcement of their rights under the law. There would be no one to enforce reinstatement orders for workers who were wrongfully terminated and businesses would lose a forum to address disputes. Despite its name, this bill would create uncertainty rather than prevent it. The bill purports to be an effort to enforce the District of Columbia Circuit Court’s January opinion in Noel Canning v. NLRB. That decision, which has been sharply criticized as partisan and contrary to decades of precedent, has already been appealed to the Supreme Court. It would be improper as well as unusual for Congress to insert itself into this process even if the Circuit Court’s ruling was widely accepted, which it is not. In fact, since the 1980s, hundreds of nominees have been placed in various positions throughout federal agencies and the courts by recess appointments like these, including 12 Republicans to the NLRB. Every president since Reagan has appointed a member to the board through the recess appointment clause. President Reagan made 240 recess appointments; President Clinton made 139; and President George W. Bush made 171. Former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan, former U.S. representative to the U.N. John Bolton, and NLRB member Peter Schaumber were all appointed during intra-session recesses. President Obama was forced to appoint Sharon Block, Terence Flynn, and Richard Griffin to the NLRB because the Senate Republicans vowed to block all nominations to the board. Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) even said that the board being “inoperable is progress.” This bill represents more of the same from the House Republicans: partisan legislation aimed at achieving ideological goals instead of pursuing solutions to help our country. House Republicans have made it their goal to break the NLRB any way they can, and this legislation is another step towards that end.

- 4 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 624 - Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill requires the director of National Intelligence (DNI) to establish procedures to promote the sharing of information about cyber threat intelligence between intelligence agencies and the private sector. It also requires DNI to establish procedures for protecting privacy and civil liberties with respect to such shared information. The bill provides authority for companies to use this intelligence to protect vital networks. The measure does not prescribe rules that require the sharing of cyber intelligence, either within the private sector or between the private sector and government, and allows the private sector to determine the level of detail of information it shares with the government and other private entities.

In order to further promote information-sharing by the private sector, the bill provides that shared information may not be used by other entities to gain an unfair competitive advantage, and provides liability protection for companies that act in “good faith” and choose to protect their networks. In order to protect privacy and civil liberties, the measure requires the government to remove all personally identifiable information, limits what information companies can share with the government and prohibits the government from requiring companies to give the government information in exchange for receiving cyber threat intelligence. The bill also requires an annual report from the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community to ensure that none of the information provided to the government is mishandled or misused.

Last year, the House passed a similar cyber security by a 248-168 vote. This year’s bill includes a number of changes to address certain privacy and civil liberties concerns, including removing the broad “national security” allowable purpose, requiring the government to remove personally identifiable information from information shared by private companies, and explicitly prohibiting companies from “hacking back” against cyber attackers.

The Rule makes in order no further general debate. As of last night, the House debated through Amash Amendment #6. The following amendments remain to be debated:

Rep. Sinema Amendment. Adds the DHS Inspector General (IG) to the list of those responsible for submitting an annual report to Congress. Also adds the House Committee on Homeland Security and the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs to the report recipients, which currently include the congressional intelligence committees
Rep. Loretta Sanchez Amendment. Adds language including the Privacy and Civil Rights and Civil Liberties offices of the Department of Homeland Security to the list of those responsible for submitting an annual report to Congress that assesses the privacy and civil liberties impact (if any) of the government’s information sharing under the bill
Reps. LaMalfa/Rogers (MI) Amendment. Clarifies that nothing in the bill authorizes the government to target a U.S. citizen for surveillance
Rep. Paulsen Amendment. Establishes the sense of congress that international cooperation should be encouraged where possible under this bill
Rep. Barton Amendment. Clarifies that nothing in the bill permits companies to sell consumers' personal information to other companies for marketing purposes
Rep. Jackson Lee Amendment. Clarifies that nothing in the bill requires government cybersecurity contractors to provide information about cybersecurity incidents unless they pose a threat to the security of federal government’s information
Rep. McCaul Amendment. Designates the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice as the civilian agencies to receive cyber threat and cyber crime information respectively and requires privacy and civil liberties protections to be undertaken

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1549 - Cantorcare (PULLED FROM FLOOR AT LAST MINUTE)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill would reopen enrollment in the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Program (PCIP) and remove the requirement that PCIP enrollees be without coverage for six months prior to enrolling in the program. It pays for this by zeroing out funding for the Prevention and Public Health Fund for FY 2013-2016. PCIP was created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to provide interim health care coverage to individuals with pre-existing conditions until January 1, 2014, when all of the law’s insurance reforms took effect and new healthcare marketplaces opened. The ACA authorized $5 billion to pay beneficiary claims and cover administrative costs that exceeded premiums collected from enrollees in PCIP. The law also gave the Secretary authority to stop accepting applications before the program’s termination date of December 31, 2013, and make other adjustments in order to ensure that program costs did not exceed the $5 billion appropriated. On February 15, 2013, new enrollment was suspended to ensure that the program would be able to cover the costs of the more than 107,000 enrollees through the end of the year. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that reopening enrollment and removing the six-month waiting period would increase the PCIP program’s cost by $2.8 billion through its termination on December 31, 2013. The Prevention and Public Health Fund was enacted in response to overwhelmingly bipartisan support for prevention efforts and in recognition of the lack of a targeted and sustained federal initiative to address chronic and costly conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and obesity. Almost 800 organizations have voiced their strong support for the Prevention and Public Health Fund, and have denounced efforts to repeal or defund it. During the 112th Congress, the House voted at least four times to repeal or defund the Fund and over 30 times to repeal or defund part or all of the ACA. This is yet another fruitless effort by Republicans to gut the Affordable Care Act.

H.R. 527 - Helium Stewardship Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill would extend the Department of the Interior’s authority to operate the Federal Helium Reserve and allow it to continue selling crude helium after the program's debt is repaid. If Congress fails to act, our nation’s helium supply could be disrupted, resulting in price spikes and supply shortages for American businesses, including high-tech manufacturing firms; scientific research; and federal agencies, such as NASA. It requires that subsequent helium sales be made by the Secretary through a competitive auction system, allowing the price of federally-owned helium to be set by on supply & demand and maximizing the return to taxpayers. It also modifies the federal helium program to increase price transparency and promote greater competition in the private helium market by giving new refiners access to the federal helium reserve pipeline. The bill also provides protection for federal researchers, by phasing-out the federal reserve and ending private sales when reserves decline to 3 billion cubic feet of helium. Remaining helium would be reserved for federal agencies for medical and scientific uses. The Rule provides for no further general debate and makes in order 4 amendments, each debatable for 10 minutes, equally divided between the offeror and an opponent. The amendments are: Reps. Collins/Austin Amendment. Restates that excess funds from the sale of the Reserve's helium are used to reduce the annual Federal budget deficit. Reps. Dent/Higgins/Esty Amendment. Delays implementation of the bill’s provisions for existing companies with contracts to receive helium from the reserve, delaying completely market-based helium pricing per terms of the current contracts until as late as 2018. Rep. Holt Amendment. Requires an assessment of how closing the Federal Helium Reserve could influence helium availability, including options for insuring a reliable helium supply in coming decades. Rep. Thornberry Amendment. Affirms the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to allow private entities to connect to and store helium in the Federal Helium Reserve for an appropriate fee.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1406 - [Attacking Workers 5] Ending Workers' Right to Overtime Pay Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would take away the right workers currently have to overtime pay and instead authorize employers to provide compensatory time off (“comp time”) to private sector employees at a rate of 1.5 hours per hour of overtime employment. It would also require an employer to provide monetary compensation, after the end of a calendar year, for any unused compensatory time off accrued during the preceding year, while prohibiting an employee from accruing more than 160 hours of compensatory time. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) implemented the 40 hour workweek to allow workers time to be with their families and create a need for more workers for larger workloads. When workers earn overtime, they receive compensation during the pay period in which they have worked beyond 40 hours. This bill would effectively put an end to the 40 hour work week without any guarantee of proper compensation for extra time worked, and would strip employees of the flexibility to meet workplace and family needs. The FLSA already allows employers to let their employees earn paid time off. However, under this bill, employers can take all of those wages earned above 40 hours and put them towards future time off controlled by the employer. Employees would not get paid for the overtime work they perform during the current pay period. Instead, they would receive time off later; if that time is unused, they would be paid back at the end of the year. This amounts to a no-interest loan to employers from workers and would encourage employers to demand longer hours because they would receive the benefits of overtime work at no additional cost. Further, there is no language guaranteeing that a worker’s compensatory time would be paid out in the event of bankruptcy or if a business shuts down. H.R. 1406 also includes no guaranteed right for an employee to use saved compensatory time; employers’ only responsibility is to permit employees "to use such time within a reasonable period after making the request if the use of the compensatory time does not unduly disrupt the operations of the employer." The bill includes no language concerning an employer’s timely response to an employee’s request. It also provides no recourse for employees if the employer deems the time off as “unduly disruptive” to operation. This would mean that not only would employees be away from their families longer by be being required to spend more time at work, while being denied overtime pay, but also that employers would also have complete control over compensatory time, even in the case of a personal or family emergency. This bill has been considered several times since 1996 and claims to provide working families with “flexibility.” Instead, it does the exact opposite: it strips employees of rights that the FLSA has provided for nearly 75 years and reduces the flexibility they have to spend time outside the normal work week with their families. In keeping with their “Making Life Work” public relations push, House Republicans once again are using a misleading bill title to hide their repeated attacks on pay and benefits for middle class families. In a time of high unemployment, Republicans should be pursuing measures that create jobs and stability instead of attacking workers' paychecks, benefits and flexibility.

H.R. 807 - Pay China First Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would require the U.S. Treasury to continue to borrow once the statutory debt limit is reached – but only to pay the principal and interest on government debt held by the public and by the Social Security trust funds, not to pay other debts or legal obligations. Under the measure, the Treasury could not borrow above the federal debt limit for any other purpose than to pay selected holders of our debt, many of whom are outside of the U.S.; all other already-incurred bills would have to be paid by general revenues on a cash-flow basis, which would force Treasury to default on many of our other obligations. Obligations not guaranteed by the bill include pay for active-duty military, veterans benefits, Medicare and Medicaid payments, and payments to small businesses. The bill also requires the Treasury Department, until the debt ceiling has been raised, to submit a report each week to the Ways and Means and Senate Finance committees on the status of the debt and an accounting of new debt issued under this authority.

The Treasury makes 80 to 100 million payments per month. Both the Bipartisan Policy Center and the Council of Inspectors General on Financial Oversight, as well as the Treasury itself, have concluded that it would be simply impossible for them to pick and choose which bills get paid and which do not. In addition to being unfeasible, prioritizing which bills get paid would create uncertainty that could lead to investment dumping and panic by skittish investors that could drive up interest rates and slow growth. As JP Morgan Chief Economist Michael Feroli says, debt prioritization “would be like the financial market equivalent of that Hieronymus Bosch painting of hell.”

Despite renewed warnings of economists, Republicans are once again steering our nation towards a debt ceiling crisis like we experienced in the summer of 2011. That brinksmanship saw the Dow Jones Industrial Average plummet nearly 2000 points; the slowest job growth in 3 years; and created waves of uncertainty around the globe about our nation’s creditworthiness, culminating in the downgrade of the United States’ credit rating for the first time in history. This bill signals that Republicans are setting the stage for a repeat of that economic sabotage.

Instead of preparing for default, which is what this Republican bill does, we should be focusing on legislation that actually gets our nation on the right path. GOP Leadership should appoint budget conferees so that Democrats and Republicans can work together toward a big, balanced agreement on deficits that can replace the sequester and send a strong signal of certainty to the American people and the markets.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 5 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 45 - [37th ACA Repeal] Full Repeal of the Affordable Care Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This will mark the 37th time that Republicans have voted to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act. With the Supreme Court’s upholding of the law’s constitutionality and the reelection of President Obama, Speaker John Boehner declared: “Obamacare is the law of the land.” Even that, however, will not stop Republicans from wasting more time and taxpayer money to force yet another messaging bill through the House. The Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law three years ago, has many benefits, including: Already Providing Relief to Millions of Americans: Up to 17 million children with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied health insurance; 105 million Americans – including 71 million in private plans and 34 million in Medicare – have access to free preventive care services; 360,000 small businesses are now taking advantage of the healthcare tax credit to provide insurance to 2 million workers; 105 million Americans no longer have lifetime limits on their coverage; 6.3 million seniors in the “donut hole” have saved over $6.1 billion on their prescription drugs; Almost 13 million Americans have received $1.1 billion in rebates from their insurance companies; and 2,800 employers are taking advantage of the retiree reinsurance program to help cover over 12 million retirees not yet eligible for Medicare; Putting Americans – not insurance companies – in control of their health care by enacting multiple insurance reforms, including: Eliminating pre-existing condition exclusions for kids immediately and for all Americans by 2014; Eliminating lifetime limits and caps on coverage immediately and phasing out annual limits and caps on coverage by 2014; Prohibiting insurance companies from canceling or rescinding your policy if you get too sick; Requiring insurance companies to spend 80-85% of your premium dollars on benefits – not CEO salaries or administrative costs; and Allowing 6.6 million youth up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ insurance policy. Strengthening the Medicare program: Extending Trust Fund solvency by 8 years and reducing costs for seniors by: Providing each senior that entered the donut hole in 2010 with a $250 check to help cover drug costs; Reducing brand name drug costs in the donut hole by at least 50%, discounting generic drug costs, and closing the donut hole entirely over time; Eliminating all co-pays and deductibles for preventive services; Eliminating overpayments to Medicare Advantage plans; and Providing seniors with a free annual wellness exam. Reducing both the short-term and the long-term deficit: Resulted in a net deficit reduction of over $100 billion within the first decade. Slowed the growth in long-term health care spending, resulting in over $1 trillion of savings in the second ten years Repeal turns the clock back on all of this – it increases the deficit, puts insurance companies back in control of Americans’ health care, increases costs and cuts benefits for Medicare seniors, and eliminates $40 billion in tax credits to help make insurance more affordable for small businesses.

H.R. 1062 - Hamstring the SEC Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would require the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Chief Economist to conduct a cost-benefit analysis of proposed regulations and how the benefits of proposed regulations justify their costs to a multitude of entities including: market participants, individuals, different-sized businesses, and other bodies (including state and local governments) as well as their effect on investor choice, market liquidity, and small businesses—before the SEC can issue them. The bill would also require the SEC to identify and assess alternatives to regulations that it considers to explain why a regulation that it issues meets regulatory objectives.

In truth, H.R. 1062 seeks to undermine the SEC’s ability to function. It would substantially raise the bar for the SEC to propose or adopt any rule, by requiring the SEC to meet a long list of new requirements that is weighted significantly in favor of industry and does not include any new accompanying investor protections. Further, this is another in a long line of Republican efforts to undermine the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act because it would relax a number of SEC rules, without the level of analysis that is necessary for rules under the Dodd-Frank. The bill also provides no new funding, requiring the SEC to divert resources from other divisions like Enforcement.

The bill would also force the SEC to review every one of its existing regulations within one year of the bill’s enactment, and every five years thereafter, to determine whether any of its regulations are ineffective, insufficient, or excessively burdensome, and to modify, streamline, expand, or repeal them in accordance with that review. This guarantees that the agency will be mired in continuous litigation, unable to issue any new rules, and potentially unable to maintain even its current rules.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 6 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 3 - [Harming Environment 1] Ignore Environmental Impacts of the Keystone Pipeline Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would declare that a presidential permit is not required for TransCanada’s revised proposal for the Keystone XL pipeline — which would allow construction of the pipeline across the U.S.-Canadian border to proceed. The pipeline would transport oil sands crude from Canada and shale oil produced in North Dakota and Montana to a market hub in Nebraska for further delivery to Gulf Coast refineries. Under the bill, final environmental impact statements issued to date would be considered sufficient to satisfy all requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act. The bill also states that the Interior Department and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are deemed to have granted all the necessary permits for the pipeline to proceed (including permits under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act). The bill would also grant jurisdiction for legal disputes over the pipeline or the constitutionality of this bill to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia or the Supreme Court. Claims regarding the pipeline must be brought within 60 days of the action that gives rise to the claim.

H.R. 1911 - [Limiting Education 1] Making College More Expensive Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill modifies how interest rates on most federal student loans are set, returning to a system under which interest rates are tied to market rates.

If action is not taken the interest rate on federal subsidized Stafford student loans is set to increase from 3.4 % to 6.8% on July 1st. Republicans need to take short term action now to stop student loan interest rates from doubling by freezing the current 3.4% interest rate, and by working together on a longer-term solution in the Higher Education Reauthorization process to address college affordability, accessibility, and completion in addition to needed reforms in financial aid packaging and delivery, including student loan interest rates.

This bill ties the interest rates for all federal student loans (except Perkins loans) issued on or after July 1, 2013, to 10-year Treasury notes — with rates for subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford loans to be set each year at the 10-year Treasury note plus 2.5%.  Rates for graduate and Parent PLUS loans would be set at the 10-year note plus 4.5%. Overall interest rates would be capped at 8.5% for Stafford loans and 10.5% for graduate and Parent PLUS loans, respectively. The resulting rates will be higher, on average, than under current law; some students will pay more for their loans, generating $3.7 billion for deficit reduction.

The bill stipulates that rates would be determined on June 1 of each year, with the Treasury note rate being set by the most recent Treasury auction. Those rates would remain in effect for the 12-month period beginning on July 1.  But under this bill, rates on these loans would also reset each year, preventing borrowers from locking in interest rates as they currently can. The bill also maintains the current method for calculating the interest rate on consolidation loans; however, it removes the current interest rate cap of 8.25%.

- 5 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2216 - [1st of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Military Construction and Veterans Affairs

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2216 appropriates $73.3 billion in discretionary budget authority for veterans' programs and military construction for FY 2014, which is 3.4% higher than the FY 2013 level under sequestration. Accounting for mandatory programs including veterans’ health benefits, the measure provides a total of $152.8 billion in spending. Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the $967 billion discretionary spending cap included in the Republican (Ryan) Budget Resolution rather than the $1.058 trillion cap agreed upon in the Budget Control Act. As a result, this bill leaves even less room for other agencies and programs in appropriations bills to be considered later this year, as Republicans try and ‘frontload’ some of the appropriations bills while still promising $91 billion in appropriations cuts.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2217 - [2nd of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Homeland Security

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2217 appropriates $38.993 billion in discretionary budget authority in FY 2014 for the Department of Homeland Security. The discretionary budget authority is $600 million below the FY 2013 enacted level and $37 million below the President’s request for FY 2014, but $1.234 billion above the FY 2013 level under sequestration. Accounting for an additional $1.46 billion in mandatory Coast Guard pension payments and $5.626 billion in designated disaster relief, the measure provides a total of $46.079 billion. Relative to FY 2013 enacted levels, the bill increases funding for Customs and Border Protection and cybersecurity but reduces funding for the Coast Guard, Transportation Security Administration, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). It continues funds for state and local law enforcement to carry out immigration enforcement activities, and rejects the administration proposal to decrease the number of detention beds the government maintains for preparing individuals to be deported. It also prohibits the use of ICE funding to provide for abortions and prohibits funds to transfer or release detainees from Guantánamo Bay. Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the $967 billion discretionary spending cap included in the Republican (Ryan) Budget Resolution rather than the $1.058 trillion cap agreed upon in the Budget Control Act. As a result, this bill leaves even less room for other agencies and programs in appropriations bills to be considered later this year, as Republicans try and ‘frontload’ some of the appropriations bills while still promising $91 billion in appropriations cuts.

- 5 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 4 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1256 - Swap Jurisdiction Certainty Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill would require the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to develop a joint approach to the regulation of derivatives trading that takes place outside the U.S. The bill would exempt foreign entities in compliance with the regulatory requirements of certain nations from those U.S. requirements unless the SEC and CFTC jointly determine that the regulatory requirements are not “broadly equivalent” to U.S. swaps requirements.

H.R. 1960 - FY2014 National Defense Authorization Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill would provide for the authorization of funding for the Department of Defense and other related agencies, programs, and operations for Fiscal Year 2014. It provides for $552.1 billion in new discretionary authority for DOD ($54 billion above sequestration levels) plus an additional $85.8 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) ($5 billion above the President’s request).

In addition to authorizing all operations at the Pentagon, as well as military operations overseas, the bill also includes some policy additions/restrictions, including: a restriction of funds used to both release prisoners at the Guantánamo Bay detention center to a foreign country or entity, and on domestic transfers and construction or modification of U.S. facilities to house Guantánamo detainees; Sexual Assault Prevention (SAP), including a removal of commanders’ authority to dismiss or reduce court martial sentences, new mandatory minimums, longer statutes of limitations, victim counseling, and SAP training requirements and oversight; and language aimed at expanding religious freedom protections for service members.

- 6 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1797 - Criminalize Abortions After 20 Weeks Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill would ban abortions nationwide in cases where the probable age of the fetus is 20 weeks or later. The bill imposes criminal penalties (fines and/or imprisonment of up to 5 years) on medical professionals who violate the ban. The measure provides an exception for cases where the life of the woman is in danger due to a physical illness or physical condition. There is also an exception for cases of incest against a minor and rape, providing the rape or incest has been reported to law enforcement.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1947 - Farm Bill - End Nutrition Assistance for 2 Million Americans (FAILED ON HOUSE FLOOR)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill extends most major federal farm, nutrition assistance, rural development and agricultural trade programs through FY 2018 — but repeals or modifies certain major programs, including dairy programs, and direct payments to farmers. It repeals direct and countercyclical payments to agriculture commodity producers and replaces them with new risk-management programs to protect farmers when they suffer losses. It also repeals several major dairy programs and replaces them with a new program to manage the supply of dairy products, it expands crop insurance coverage, and it consolidates major conservation programs. According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the bill would reduce spending by $33.3 billion (plus about $6 billion in savings from sequestration) over 10 years compared to the baseline, including a reduction of $20.5 billion to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The bill significantly restricts so-called "categorical eligibility" for SNAP, under which individuals become eligible for SNAP benefits based on their participation in other low-income assistance programs. This would result in the loss of SNAP benefits for about 2 million Americans (and eliminate school lunch eligibility for about 210,000 children). Changes in the bill to the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)/SNAP interaction would also cut benefits for about 1.7 million Americans.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1613 - Outer Continental Shelf Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreements Authorization Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would approve a February 2012 agreement that created a framework for U.S. offshore drilling companies and Mexico's Petróleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, to jointly develop oil in the Gulf of Mexico, outside both countries' economic zone waters. The agreement is strongly supported by major oil companies, the Interior and State departments, Democrats and Republicans. However, the bill also includes a waiver to a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) provision added by Dodd-Frank requiring energy companies to report mineral payments to foreign governments. The SEC disclosure requirement is designed to improve transparency and reduce government corruption in resource-rich nations. Under Dodd-Frank, any payment made by oil companies to a foreign government to “further” the commercial development of oil and gas has to be disclosed to shareholders and the American public. By waiving this requirement for transboundary agreements, H.R. 1613 would allow oil companies to make undisclosed payments to foreign governments.

H.R. 2231 - [Harming Environment 2] Open our Coasts to Oil and Gas Drilling Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would direct the Interior Department to develop a new five-year offshore leasing plan that makes available for oil and gas exploration and development at least 50% of the unleased coastal areas with the most potential for energy production. The bill would create a nationwide revenue sharing system so coastal states would receive a 37.5% share of the federal royalties (revenue from offshore oil and gas leasing and development is currently one of the largest non-tax revenue streams for the federal government). This provision would allow states to use these revenues “for any purpose as determined by the laws of that State.” The bill also requires the plan to establish a domestic oil and natural gas production goal under the Administration’s current 2012–2017 Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leasing plan of 3 million barrels of oil per day and 10 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day by 2027 (which is triple current production levels). Lastly, the bill requires that drilling be allowed more immediately off the coasts of California, South Carolina, and Virginia, and statutorily reorganizes the Interior Department agencies that oversee offshore leasing and permitting, safety inspections and revenue collection.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2609 - [3rd of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Energy and Water

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2609 appropriates $30.4 billion in FY 2014 for the Energy Department and federal water projects, which is $4.1 billion below the President’s request and $6.3 billion (17%) below the enacted level for FY 2013. Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the $967 billion discretionary spending cap included in the Republican (Ryan) Budget Resolution rather than the $1.058 trillion cap agreed upon in the Budget Control Act. As a result, this bill leaves even less room for other agencies and programs in appropriations bills to be considered later this year, as Republicans try and ‘frontload’ some of the appropriations bills while still promising $91 billion in appropriations cuts. The measure increases funding for the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile, but cuts funding for fossil fuels and alternative energy programs and nuclear energy research and development. Funding would also be reduced for a wide range of activities, including Army Corps of Engineers projects, Energy Department science programs, advanced energy research, defense and non-defense environmental cleanup activities, nuclear non-proliferation programs, and most renewable energy programs.

H.R. 2642 - [Farm Bill Do-Over Part 1] Agriculture Subsidies Without Nutrition Assistance

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill is nearly identical to H.R. 1947, the amended, committee–approved Farm Bill that failed to pass the House in June. The bill contains two significant changes: it omits the Nutrition title, thus excluding funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). It also adds a new provision, which repeals “permanent law” by striking the language from H.R. 1947 that made the new farm program provisions in Title 1 effective only for 2014-2018, effectively making 2013 Farm Bill commodity provisions that include the repeal of direct and countercyclical payments and other producer agreements as well as new dairy programs and reference prices that expand the farm safety net the new “permanent law.” The measure extends most major federal farm, rural development and agricultural trade programs through FY 2018 — but repeals or modifies certain major programs, including dairy programs, and direct payments to farmers. It repeals direct and countercyclical payments to agriculture commodity producers and replaces them with new risk-management programs to protect farmers when they suffer losses. It also repeals several major dairy programs and replaces them with a new taxpayer program to support dairy producers, it expands crop insurance coverage, and it consolidates major conservation programs.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2667 - [38th ACA Repeal] Employer Responsibility

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would codify the Administration's July 2nd announcement to delay for one year the Affordable Care Act's requirement that businesses with 50 or more full-time employees/equivalents provide health insurance to their workers or pay a penalty. This policy will now take effect on January 1, 2015, giving the Administration more time to simplify employer reporting requirements and businesses more time to adapt their health coverage to new requirements. The employer responsibility impacts roughly four percent of America's businesses, and the delay will have minimal impact upon the implementation of other Affordable Care Act policies, coverage estimates and costs. 95% of those employers required by the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage already do so and there is no reason to believe they will not continue to do so. Employees under 400% Federal Poverty Level (FPL) who remain uncovered will be able to use tax credits and other subsidies to purchase insurance in the Federal Marketplace or their state exchange. Under the Affordable Care Act employer responsibility requirement, an employer with 50 or more full-time employees/equivalents that chooses not to offer adequate, affordable individual and family coverage to its employees must pay an annual penalty of $2,000 to $3,000 per full-time worker (minus the first 30 employees) if at least one full-time employee obtains premium tax credit subsidies for Exchange/Marketplace-based coverage. The Administration has stated that this bill is unnecessary because they've already taken action. The Congressional Budget Office has confirmed that there is no budget effect because the delay will occur even absent legislation.

H.R. 2668 - [39th ACA Repeal] Individual Responsibility

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill delays for one year, until 2015, the requirement in the Affordable Care Act that individuals buy health insurance or pay a tax penalty. The Affordable Care Act provides tax credits and other subsidies for the purchase of health insurance to individuals and families between 100 – 400% FPL who do not have access to affordable employer-offered health insurance coverage. The individual responsibility policy is paired with critical insurance market reforms — guaranteed issue and a prohibition against pre-existing condition exclusions and predatory pricing, among others — allowing the quality of insurance to significantly improve while minimizing premium increases. The Congressional Budget Office has confirmed that delaying the individual responsibility will increase premiums and decrease coverage. New Marketplace Exchanges are on track to open on October 1 and states are readying themselves. Premium filings have come in lower than expected in many states, with some filings showing premiums reduced by as much as 50 percent.

H.R. 5 - [Limiting Education 2] Letting Students Down Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) for fiscal years 2014 through 2019 and authorizes $114.3 billion in funding through FY2018 for federal education programs. The bill makes several detrimental funding changes to programs in ESEA. It combines the funding for all programs and subgroups included in Title I (Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged) of ESEA into a block grant called Local Academic Flex Grants. States and local districts are allowed to use these grants for any activity authorized under Title I at any school that receives Title I funds. The bill requires that 10% of the Local Academic Flex Grants be used for private sector schools. The bill also eliminates the poverty threshold requirement of current law, which states that if the percentage of students living in poverty in a particular school is less than 40%, Title I funds must be spent on programs targeting those low-income students specifically. These two changes would have the effect of allowing funds to be diverted away from schools with the highest poverty and allows districts to send less money to low-income schools and more money to wealthier schools. Lastly, H.R. 5 block-grants all funding for special populations such as English learners, migrant students, Native students, and at-risk students, and allows those funds to be spent outside of those populations. The bill also makes several changes to the the way teachers are evaluated and how funding for teacher improvement can be used. H.R. 5 repeals the highly-qualified teacher requirement (under current law, in order to be deemed a highly qualified teacher, public school teachers must hold at least a bachelor's degree, have obtained full state certification or have passed the state teacher licensing examination, and hold a license to teach), as well as the requirement that qualified teachers be equitably distributed so that some areas are not disproportionately served by unqualified teachers. This allows funding for teacher supports to be shifted away from the poorest schools to wealthier ones. It also eliminates the requirement to ensure quality professional development for teachers, only assessing them for hiring or firing, and eliminates dedicated funding for this purpose. The bill also weakens protections for students with disabilities and fails to ensure that all children receive quality education. H.R. 5 eliminates the 1% cap for the number of students allowed to be assessed under alternative standards. This would permit all students with disabilities to be held to lower standards and given different assessments, effectively allowing those students to be educated in a lesser system. Further, it removes limits on the numbers of students who can be diverted into this alternate system, creating a perverse incentive to over-identify children for special education as a way to improve the average performance score of those students who remain in the regular assessment system. Finally, the bill removes graduation rates as an accountability measure, again creating a perverse incentive to encourage lower performing students to drop out. Instead of improving standards and accountability to ensure that students are college or career ready, H.R. 5 removes accountability provisions that ensure all students receive a quality education. The bill allows states to weaken standards, weaken the assessment process, and institute weak accountability systems that would not require performance targets for student achievement, specific actions to improve low performance, or consequences if schools do not improve. There is no question that the Elementary and Secondary Education Act is overdue for an update. However, instead of fixing the problems and improving quality and testing provisions, H.R. 5 would provide inadequate funding and move backward on equity and accountability, harming the education of our nation’s children.

- 6 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2397 - [4th of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Defense

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2397 appropriates $512.5 billion in FY 2014 discretionary funding for the Department of Defense ($26.2 billion above current FY 2013 funding after sequestration) plus an additional $85.8 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) ($5 billion above the President’s request). The measure also includes a military pay raise of 1.8% (0.8% above the President’s request) and continues provisions prohibiting the transfer of Guantanamo detainees to the U.S. Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the post-sequester $967 billion discretionary spending cap included in the Republican (Ryan) Budget Resolution rather than the $1.058 trillion cap agreed upon in the Budget Control Act. As a result, domestic appropriations bills were left with even less room for other agencies and programs, as Republicans fully fund the Defense Department while still promising $91 billion in appropriations cuts. Their plan for shifting sequestration’s Defense cuts onto Non-Defense appropriations bills ignores the so-called Defense Firewall written into the Budget Control Act, and so would trigger an additional Defense cut of nearly $48 billion on top of sequestration.

H.R. 2218 - [Harming Environment 3] Exempt Coal Ash from Federal Regulations Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2218 would prohibit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from regulating the disposal and management of coal combustion residuals (coal ash), instead creating a state-based permit program for the disposal of waste generated from coal combustion. The bill creates a federal program for the recognition of state-level permitting programs for the storage of coal combustion waste. The bill also limits the authority of the EPA to issue regulations or enforce standards regarding coal combustion waste, ensuring that local communities and waterways are protected from coal ash spills, unless states fail to implement their own permit program. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the bill would cost the federal government $2 million over the FY 2014 to FY 2018 period, subject to the availability of appropriated funds. There is currently no offsetting reduction in programmatic authorization in the legislation.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 13 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2610 - [5th of 12 FY2014 Appropriation Bills] Transportation, Housing, Urban Development (PULLED FROM FLOOR AT LAST MINUTE)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill provides a total of $97.6 billion for Transportation and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) departments and related agencies, including $53.5 billion to be released from the highway and aviation trust funds and $44.1 billion in discretionary appropriations. The discretionary portion of this bill is nearly $10 billion below the version currently under consideration in the Senate. The bill funds federal-aid highway programs at the levels prescribed by last year's highway authorization law and increases funding for highway, truck and rail safety. The measure also reduces aviation, mass transit and housing programs, making major cuts to Amtrak (33%), Community Development Block Grants (45%) and HOME grants (30%). Republicans are developing this year's spending bills based on the post-sequester $967 billion discretionary spending cap included in the Republican (Ryan) Budget Resolution rather than the $1.058 trillion cap agreed upon in the Budget Control Act. As a result, domestic appropriations bills were left with even less room as Republicans fully fund the Defense Department while still promising $91 billion in appropriations cuts. Senate Democrats, meanwhile, are developing their FY 2014 spending bills using the $1.058 trillion cap set by the Budget Control Act. The Senate is currently considering its version of the FY 2014 T-HUD spending bill, which would provide $107.5 billion in total budgetary resources. $54 billion of the Senate version is discretionary budget authority, almost $10 billion more in discretionary spending than the $44.1 billion in the House bill.

H.R. 2879 - [Attacking Workers 5] Block Any Federal Employees From Getting Bonuses Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2879 is a combination of three bills from the Oversight and Government Reform Committee: H.R. 2711 – Citizen Empowerment Act, H.R. 2579 – Government Employee Accountability Act, and H.R. 1541 – Common Sense in Compensation Act. The measure allows individuals to record conversations with federal agencies and requires federal agencies to provide notice to individuals about their right to record conversations. Specifically, the bill provides that when a federal employee is acting in his or her official capacity, he or she is automatically providing consent to have both in-person and telephonic interactions recorded by anyone present during the interaction. In addition, the bill gives federal agencies expanded options to target Senior Executive Service (SES) employees, including allowing the termination of such employees for misappropriation of funds (specifically, paying for Conferences) and allowing them to be placed on unpaid leave for "flagrant" conduct in which an employee intentionally engaged. An agency could use an inspector general report finding that states an SES employee has committed a crime as the basis for removing or suspending the employee without pay. In the instance of such an inspector general report, the employee would not be entitled to 30 days of advance notice of the proposed termination or suspension without pay. H.R. 2879 would also limit, during any fiscal year in which sequestration is in force, bonuses or performance awards paid to federal employees. Under this bill, the total compensation for any federal employee could not exceed 105% of the total basic pay that that individual receives, and no more than 33% of eligible employees in any government agency may receive performance awards. Agencies may also request that more than 33% of employees be permitted to receive performance awards. If the Office of Personnel Management grants such a waiver, the agency must notify Congress of the percentage of employees receiving the awards and the dollar amount of each award. This bill represents yet another example of the time-wasting, short-sighted, and counterproductive campaign against federal employees that we saw last Congress.

H.R. 1582 - [Harming Environment 4] Block Regulations That Protect Public Health and the Environment Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill prohibits the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from finalizing regulations estimated to cost more than $1 billion if the Energy Department determines that the regulations will cause significant adverse effects to the economy. The measure would effectively prevent EPA from finalizing any regulations and would give the Energy Department a veto over EPA's air and water pollution rules or any other rule interpreted to be "energy-related." The measure could also indefinitely delay EPA energy-related rules because there are no deadlines for EPA to submit its report or for the Energy Department to complete its study.

H.R. 2009 - [40th ACA Repeal] Hamstring the IRS

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill prohibits the Treasury Secretary, or any delegate of the Secretary – including the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) – from implementing or enforcing any provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). One of the cornerstones of the ACA, ensuring access to care, is accomplished by implementing over $1 trillion in subsidies and tax credits for middle class families and small businesses for the purchase of coverage. These tax breaks, aimed at making coverage more affordable, come in the form of premium tax credits, available only if a taxpayer does not have an affordable coverage offer from an employer and if the household income for the taxable year is 100-400 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL). In addition, cost sharing subsidies also will be made available under the ACA so that co-pays for services such as doctor visits and hospital admissions are affordable. This bill, by prohibiting the IRS from making or enforcing rules on premium tax credits for exchange coverage and small business tax credits for employee coverage, would cause millions of middle class American families and small businesses to be stripped of access to these tax credits and, consequently, access to affordable care. Eliminating hundreds of billions of dollars in tax breaks (that would serve as incentive for obtaining coverage) amounts to a tax hike on millions of middle class families and businesses who would otherwise benefit and would derail implementation of the ACA, which is Republicans’ long-stated goal. This will mark the 40th time that Republicans have voted to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act. With the Supreme Court’s upholding of the law’s constitutionality and the reelection of President Obama, Speaker John Boehner declared: “Obamacare is the law of the land.” Even that, however, has not stopped Republicans from wasting more time and taxpayer money to force yet another messaging bill through the House. With little time left before a five-week recess, the GOP Leadership should instead be finishing work on a budget that replaces the sequester and sends a strong signal of certainty to the American people and the markets.

H.R. 367 - Block the President and Agencies From Doing Anything

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill modifies the federal rule-making process by requiring Congress to approve executive agency regulatory proposals that are deemed to be “major rules” (those with an economic impact greater than $100 million) – rather than allowing Congress to disapprove of those proposed rules and regulations, as is currently the case under the Congressional Review Act (CRA). This bill would seek to give Congress the responsibility of approving any rule proposed by the administration before it can go into effect.

By requiring Congressional approval of major rules, this measure would stifle Federal agency rulemaking, while undermining the ability of agencies to provide essential protections to Americans.

The GOP Leadership continues to pursue an ideological agenda while not taking action to create jobs, finish a budget, or end the sequester. With just two days left before the August district work period, there is nothing on the schedule to address the numerous critical issues facing Congress. Instead, Republicans continue to waste more time on messaging bills. H.R. 367 would give the Republican Majority even more legislative responsibility than they currently have, which they have repeatedly demonstrated they are unable to handle.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 8 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2775 - [41st ACA Repeal] Requiring Redundant Subsidy Verification

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would prohibit federal financial assistance from being provided to individuals who purchase health coverage through the new state exchanges until a new, duplicative and unnecessary income verification program is in place. Specifically, no insurance premium tax credits or reductions in cost-sharing would be allowed until the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services verifies the eligibility of all applicants. The bill would create vague standards for the Inspector General, whose office has never performed this type of review. Since the role of the Inspector General is to investigate and conduct oversight on government agencies and not on individuals, under this bill, the Inspector General would essentially need to create an entire new system, which would mean that subsidies and tax credits would not be able to start on January 1, 2014. The Affordable Care Act is structured to permit advance payment of premium tax credits directly to the Exchange plans so that families obtain real-time assistance instead of waiting for a tax refund after the end of the year. Exchanges are responsible for verifying applicants’ incomes and employer-coverage information in order to accurately determine who is eligible for tax credits and subsidies. H.R. 2775 is unnecessary because the Secretary of Health and Human Services has already put in place an effective and efficient system for verification of eligibility for premium tax credits and cost sharing reductions. Passage of H.R. 2775 would delay tax credits and cost-sharing reductions that will otherwise be provided to millions of Americans, driving up out-of-pocket health care costs for millions of Americans and reducing timely access to much‑needed and long‑denied affordable coverage. This bill is simply another effort by Republicans to undermine the Affordable Care Act and would essentially be the 41st vote to repeal or defund health reform. The bill would indefinitely undercut one of the central provisions of the health care law – the provision of federal subsidies to ensure that health care coverage is affordable for low- and middle-income households. H.R. 2775 is completely unnecessary because the Department of Health and Human Services already has a strong income verification system in place, as confirmed by the Congressional Budget Office.

- 5 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 761 - [Harming Environment 5] Exempt Mining Operations from Environmental Review Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill would reduce or eliminate environmental reviews, and give mining companies control over the timing of permitting decisions, for virtually all types of mining operations on federal public land, not just those involving strategic or critical minerals. It does this by defining “strategic and critical” minerals so broadly that they would include everything from minerals like gold, silver, copper and uranium (which are critical to defense, energy infrastructure & production, and manufacturing) to plentiful materials such as sand, clay, gravel and potentially even coal. Further, the bill deems all mines to be “infrastructure projects” in order to put them in line with an Executive Order aimed at reducing permitting time for surface transportation, aviation, pipelines and other infrastructure projects that have lesser environmental effects than mining. Lastly, it requires the Interior Department to waive compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) if the federal or state permitting process is deemed “adequate” and requires federal agencies to enter into agreements with mining companies to set time limits for each part of the permit review process and limit total review time to 30 months. In addition to reducing or eliminating environmental reviews in order to receive mining permits, the bill would also limit the judicial review of mine permits, barring any civil action not filed within 60 days after a final federal agency action.

H.R. 3102 - [Farm Bill Do-Over Part 2] Massive Cuts to Nutrition Assistance

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would cut funding to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by $39 billion – nearly 10 times the reductions passed in the bipartisan Senate bill, which would result in the loss of SNAP benefits for 3.8 million Americans. This bill is coming to the Floor because House Republicans rejected the original Farm Bill in June, that would have cut food stamp funding by $20.5 billion, because the cuts were not deep enough. SNAP provides assistance to 47 million Americans in need and has long been a vital tool in empowering struggling families to put food on their tables as they seek new employment, send their children to school and get themselves back on their feet. It is estimated that 4 in 5 SNAP households live below the poverty line — 2 in 5 are below half the poverty line. Republicans claim their bill will increase incentives to work. In fact, the number of SNAP households that have earnings while participating in SNAP has been rising for more than a decade, and has more than tripled — from about 2 million in 2000 to about 6.4 million in 2011. The increase was especially pronounced during the recent deep recession, suggesting that many people have turned to SNAP because of under-employment — for example: when one wage-earner in a two-parent family lost a job; when a worker’s hours were cut; or when a worker turned to a lower-paying job after being laid off. As a result, this bill will take away food from struggling Americans who are seeking employment. More generally, the Republican approach ignores SNAP’s role in supporting the economy during economic downturns and will ensure that this safety net does not work as intended in the future. The cuts in this bill would have devastating effects on some of our nation’s most vulnerable, as nearly 2/3 of recipients are children, elderly, or disabled. The bill significantly restricts so-called "categorical eligibility" for SNAP, under which individuals become eligible for SNAP benefits based on their participation in other low-income assistance programs. This would result in the loss of SNAP benefits for about 2 million Americans, and eliminate school lunch eligibility for about 210,000 children. The bill changes the interaction between SNAP and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), reducing benefits for an estimated 850,000 households according to CBO. The bill would also cut food aid for an estimated 170,000 unemployed veterans, while it is estimated that nearly 3 million veterans and their families don’t get enough to eat each month. SNAP has historically been the most responsive federal program after unemployment insurance in assisting families and communities during economic downturns. However, this bill contains all of the poison-pill amendments that sunk the previous version June, including the Southerland amendment. The Southerland amendment allows states to cut off an entire family’s food assistance benefits, including their children’s, if the parents cannot find a job or job training slot. Further, it incentivizes states to do so by allowing them to keep half of the federal savings from cutting people off SNAP and allowing the use of these funds for any purpose, including tax cuts and special-interest subsidies or plugging holes in state budgets. States that decline this option and maintain their current approach to SNAP work requirements and training would face a significant fiscal penalty: they would lose all federal matching funds for their SNAP employment and job training programs (which all states now operate). The result is an incentive for states to remove those in need from being able to receive assistance to keep food on their family’s table. In a time of high unemployment, Republicans should be pursuing measures that create jobs and opportunity for our nation’s poor instead of ones that pull the safety-net out from under them.

H.J.Res. 59 - [1st Shutdown Vote] [42nd ACA Repeal] Continue Sequestration, Defund ACA

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This resolution would fund government operations into the next fiscal year through December 15, 2013. Republicans are attempting to sell the resolution as a “clean” extension of FY2013 appropriations. In reality, however, the resolution has a topline discretionary funding rate of $988 billion – a level that includes sequestration cuts and is $55 billion below the Budget Control Act's agreed-upon $1.043 trillion level for FY2013. By continuing sequestration into FY2014, all federal agencies funded by the resolution, including the Defense Department, will once again face sequester cuts. By embracing sequestration, the resolution hinders the government's ability to provide critical and essential services to Americans, including investments in education, implementing access to affordable health care, and ensuring national security. These arbitrary, across-the-board spending cuts are harmful to our economy and national security. As our economy continues to recover, Congress should be focused on supporting sustained growth and job creation while working together to find a balanced solution to replace sequestration. The continuing resolution also includes a provision that no funds should be made available to implement any aspect of the Affordable Care Act. This provision is not expected to pass the Senate and is just another example of how the Republicans are playing games when it comes to our budget issues instead of offering a serious proposal to keep the government open or replace the irrational sequester. Including this defunding provision would mark the 42nd time that Republicans have voted to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act. With the Supreme Court’s upholding of the law’s constitutionality and the reelection of President Obama, Speaker John Boehner declared: “Obamacare is the law of the land.” Even that, however, has not stopped Republicans from wasting more time and taxpayer money on another repeal attempt that will not be signed into law. This resolution would also prioritize principal and interest on government debt held by the public and by the Social Security trust funds, putting all other debts or legal obligations in jeopardy if the debt limit is reached. Placing selected holders of our debt, many of whom are outside of the U.S., ahead of other obligations would force Treasury to default on these other obligations, including pay for active-duty military, veterans’ benefits, Medicare and Medicaid payments, and payments to small businesses. It would be simply impossible for the Treasury to pick and choose which bills get paid and which do not. As JP Morgan Chief Economist Michael Feroli says, debt prioritization “would be like the financial market equivalent of that Hieronymus Bosch painting of hell.” Instead of working to replace the sequester or working together to implement the Affordable Care Act, House Republicans are advancing legislation that irresponsibly continues sequestration and represents another partisan effort to end the Affordable Care Act that is already helping millions of Americans.

H.R. 1526 - [Harming Environment 6] Cutting Down Trees in National Forests

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill requires the U.S. Forest Service to increase timber production on National Forest lands by creating timber production zones, called “Forest Reserve Revenue Areas,” within each national forest. Zones must meet annual timber volume targets set at half of what the forest grows each year. Meeting these targets would require logging and related road building in currently roadless areas and national monuments. It would also greatly reduce environmental reviews, legislatively prescribing timber production compliance with the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA); limiting scientific review by establishing a “non-jeopardy” presumption for all logging projects; and discourage judicial review by requiring plaintiffs to post bonds to have their day in court. In addition to increased timber production on National Forest lands, the bill also walk back over 100 years of National Forest management, establishing “community forest demonstration areas” that would be at least 200,000 acres, managed by state forest councils, and governed by state forest environmental laws. The bill extends the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000 for one year at the FY2010 level. The program provides to rural counties that have national forests within their borders support payments for government services like education and law enforcement.

- 4 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 687 - Transfer Federal Lands to a Mining Company for Development Act (PULLED FROM FLOOR AT LAST MINUTE)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill directs the U.S. Agriculture Department to convey approximately 2,400 acres of federal Forest Service land to Resolution Copper, a mining company, if the company agrees to provide roughly 5,000 acres of non-federal land in return (roughly 1,200 acres would become National Forest land and the rest would be managed by the Bureau of Land Management). The 2,400 acres of land that would be provided to Resolution Copper are located in Pinal County, Ariz., and are known as the Oak Flat Parcel. The area is likely home to the country’s 3rd largest copper deposit, estimated at a size of 1.6 billion tons or about 25% of the U.S. copper supply over the next 40 years. However, the bill limits review of the environmental effects of this land transfer and has raised concern among several Native American tribes that it does not include consultation regarding the protection of sacred and cultural sites prior to the land transfer.

- 4 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

000 - [2nd Shutdown Vote] [43rd ACA Repeal] Medical Device Tax

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

000 - [3rd Shutdown Vote] [44th ACA Repeal] One Year Delay of ACA

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R.3210 - Exempting Military Pay from the Government Shutdown

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 2 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

000 - [4th Shutdown Vote] [45th ACA Repeal] One Year Delay of Individual Responsibility, Plus Ending Contribution For Members and Staff

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.J.Res.70 - [5th Shutdown Vote] Exempting National Parks and Museums

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Continues sequester level funding through December 15, 2013 to reopen the National Park System, the Smithsonian Institution, the National Gallery of Art, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The bill ignores other functions of the National Park Service, including conservation and preservation, and all other agencies under the jurisdiction of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee. This is the same legislation that failed under suspension of the Rules yesterday.

H.J.Res.71 - [6th Shutdown Vote] Exempting the District of Columbia

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Provides that the District of Columbia may expend local funds through December 15, 2013. This is the same legislation that failed under suspension of the Rules yesterday.

H.J.Res.73 - [7th Shutdown Vote] Exempting NIH

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Provides funding for those portions of the Department of Veterans Affairs not deemed essential in delivering Veterans benefits to reopen through December 15, 2013. The bill ignores all other functions, including important military installation projects, under the jurisdiction of the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee. Further, the House Republicans are providing $6.2 billion less in this bill than was provided in the bipartisan Veterans Appropriations bill that passed the House earlier this year. This is the same legislation that failed under suspension of the Rules yesterday.

H.J.Res.72 - [8th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Veterans

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Provides funding for those portions of the Department of Veterans Affairs not deemed essential in delivering Veterans benefits to reopen through December 15, 2013. The bill ignores all other functions, including important military installation projects, under the jurisdiction of the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee. Further, the House Republicans are providing $6.2 billion less in this bill than was provided in the bipartisan Veterans Appropriations bill that passed the House earlier this year. This is the same legislation that failed under suspension of the Rules on yesterday.

- 10 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R.3230 - [9th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Reserves and National Guard

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Provides funding to pay members of the Reserves and National Guard who perform inactive-duty training through January 1, 2015.

H.J.Res. 75 - [10th Shutdown Vote] Exempting FEMA

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill provides funding for protection, preparedness, response and recovery activities of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) through December 15, 2013, at the sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. The bill ignores all other functions under the jurisdiction of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee. Further, this piecemeal bill fails to provide funding for the numerous agencies that also provide assistance in the event of natural disasters.

H.J.Res. 85 - [11th Shutdown Vote] Exempting WIC

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The Republican government shutdown has left the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) without funding, leaving at risk the nearly 9 million mothers and children under five living near or below the poverty line who rely on the program’s supplemental vouchers for healthy food, infant formula and other necessities. This bill is designed to protect Republicans from public disapproval of this effect of the Republican government shutdown. It would fund the WIC program through December 15, 2013, at the sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate Continuing Resolution, while failing to provide funding for a host of similar programs designed to help vulnerable families, such as the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), senior nutrition services like congregate meals and Meals on Wheels, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 3223 - Retroactive Pay for Federal Workers

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill assures that Federal employees furloughed as a result of the Republican government shutdown will be paid at their standard rate of compensation when the shutdown ends. Unlike the piecemeal bills that Republicans have brought to the Floor that selectively fund certain government agencies while keeping other agencies shut, H.R. 3223 treats all Federal employees the same and only makes them financially whole when the shutdown ends.

H.J.Res. 77 - [12th Shutdown Vote] Exempting FDA

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The Food and Drug Safety Act provides funding for the Food and Drug Administration through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. Under the Republican government shutdown, 45% of FDA employees are furloughed. As a result, FDA is unable to support the majority of its food safety, nutrition, and cosmetics activities, such as routine establishment inspections, some compliance and enforcement activities, monitoring of imports, notification programs, and the majority of the laboratory research necessary to inform public health decision-making. Imported seafood, fruits, vegetables and other foods are not getting routine inspections. This bill fails to fund any other activities covered by the Agriculture Appropriations bill. It also fails to end the shutdown for other consumer safety agencies like the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Federal Trade Commission. The Rule for H.J.Res. 77, which was adopted last week provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

H.J.Res. 84 - [13th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Headstart

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill provides funding for the Head Start program and other Children and Families Services Programs under the Administration for Children and Families through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. Under the Republican government shutdown, Head Start centers are starting to lay off employees and close as they lose their federal support. Already, at least 7,000 children in five states have lost access to Head Start. Thousands more could be out of classrooms if this continues into November. This bill fails to fund any other activities covered by the Labor-HHS appropriations bill that serve this same population of families, including a range of other education programs from the Child Care and Development Block Grant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Assistance (IDEA) special education preschool programs to Title I funding for disadvantaged students to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to the Social Services Block Grant. The Rule for H.J.Res. 84, which was adopted last week provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

H.R.3273 - [14th Shutdown Vote] Exempting FAA

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would set up another “Super Committee” like the one created by the Budget Control Act in the summer of 2011. However, unlike that committee, the committee established by this bill is much more limited in scope, with only three issues in its mandate. The first item is the level of discretionary spending for FY2014 and beyond. The second is the debt ceiling. The third is entitlement reform. Republicans claim this will result in a discussion on deficit reduction, but their bill immediately rules out talking about closing tax loopholes to help get our fiscal house in order by precluding any consideration of revenues. Further, the bill does not include a deadline for the committee to report, does not require that a report be in the form of legislative language, and does not provide for a Floor vote on its report. This means that not only does this plan extend the Republican government shutdown indefinitely and bring the nation closer to default, but it creates a menu of “bipartisan” entitlement reforms to be used for further hostage taking by Republicans –

H.J.Res. 90 - [15th Shutdown Vote] Not-So-Super Committee That Can Only Cut Spending and Entitlements

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill provides funding for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. This bill was a last-minute addition to the Rules Committee meeting yesterday and is now being rushed to the Floor in violation of the Republican’s 3-day Rule. Under the Republican government shutdown, nearly 1/3 of all FAA employees have been furloughed, leading to suspension of critical activities including airport & TSA security inspections, evaluations, & audits, training of air traffic control specialists, operational testing and evaluation of NextGen technologies, and air traffic controller performance analysis. This bill fails to fund any other activities covered by the Transportation-Housing & Urban Development appropriations bill, including the Community Block Grant program, and agencies vital to maintenance and safety of our nation’s transportation and infrastructure. The Rule for H.J.Res. 90, which was adopted yesterday, provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.J.Res. 79 - [16th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Border Programs

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill provides funding for certain offices related to border security, immigration, and customs within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. Under the Republican government shutdown, DHS has attempted to curb the potentially devastating security risks that the nation could be exposed to, designating 86% of employees as essential. Despite that, this bill only provides for funds for: Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Coast Guard, National Protection and Programs Directorate’s Office of Biometric Identity Management, and Citizenship and Immigration Services. The bill fails to fund numerous vital DHS offices including: Secretary and Executive Management, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Information Officer, Analysis and Operations, Inspector General, Transportation Security Administration, Secret Service, National Protection and Programs Directorate’s offices other than Biometric Identity Management (Management and Administration, Infrastructure Protection and Information Security, and Federal Protective Service), Health Affairs, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Science and Technology, and Domestic Nuclear Detection. The Rule for H.J.Res. 79, which was adopted last week, provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

H.J.Res. 76 - [17th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Nuclear Programs

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill funds the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. This bill provides funding for the NNSA’s ongoing projects, including loans, related to Nuclear Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, and the Office of the Administrator. Funding for civilian personnel compensation and benefits is allowed only after the Department has “taken all necessary actions to reduce or defer non-personnel-related administrative expenses.” The bill ignores all other functions under the jurisdiction of the Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee. For instance, all major contracting awards by the Corps of Engineers have been suspended, hurting private companies and preventing job creation, and closing or reducing hours for 2,500 Corps of Engineers sites. This bill also does nothing to reopen the Department of Energy’s Office of Environment Management, which provides more than $5 billion for the safe cleanup of the legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and nuclear energy research. Finally, this bill does nothing to fund the Nuclear Regulatory Commission nor the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The Rule for H.J.Res. 76, which was adopted last week, provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

H.J.Res. 80 - [18th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Native American Programs

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The bill provides funding for the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Indian Education, and the Indian Health Service (IHS) through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. This bill provides less than 50% of the funding that Tribes receive from the federal government. More than 20 federal departments and agencies provide approximately $19 billion annually of a wide range of federal programs and services to help tribes address the critical needs of their communities. Omitted from the legislation being considered in the House are programs such as: USDA’s Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations, HUD’s Native American Housing Block Grant, and other programs important to Indian country that are funded by the Departments of Education, Transportation, Labor, Energy, HHS, and EPA. The Rule for H.J.Res. 80, which was adopted last week, provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

H.J.Res. 83 - [19th Shutdown Vote] Exempting Impact Aid

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill provides funding for the Impact Aid program through December 15, 2013, at the $986 billion sequester-reduced funding levels, the same level of funding in the clean Senate CR. Under the Republican government shutdown, Impact Aid payments to school districts with high concentrations of federally-connected students, including the children of active military personnel, will be delayed, disrupting the delivery of educational and support services to districts that are already struggling as a result of Republican budget cuts. Since 2010, Republican cuts to educational investments have decimated local budgets in Impact Aid-receiving school districts, forcing these districts to close summer intervention programs, lay off teachers and instructional aides, and cut back to four-day school weeks. This bill fails to fund any other education programs, including activities that Impact Aid school districts rely upon to serve the same students, such as Title I for disadvantaged students, IDEA for Students with Disabilities, and Title IV, for before-school, after-school, and summer school programs. The Rule for H.J.Res. 83, which was adopted last week provides for a closed Rule and 40 minutes of general debate.

H.R. 2775 - End the Government Shutdown and Raise the Debt Limit (passed with 198 Ds and 87 Rs)

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 3080 - Water Resources Reform and Development Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill authorizes $12 billion for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to construct, operate, and maintain water projects for mitigating storm and hurricane damage, restoring ecosystems, and improving flood management. The bill also deauthorizes $12 billion of funding for older projects and establishes a procedure for future deauthorizations for previously authorized projects with no funding. The bill also would authorize the agency to assist state and local governments with levee safety programs and to assist Indian tribes with planning and technical assistance for water resources projects. The bill also increases expenditures from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund (HMTF). Finally, H.R. 3080 would direct the Corps to implement a pilot program to enter agreements with nonfederal partners to manage and construct certain projects. Those agreements would be subject to appropriation of all federal costs.

- 6 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 4 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 2374 - Prevent Labor Department from Regulating Broker Dealers

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would require that the SEC complete a rulemaking on fiduciary standards for broker dealers before the Department of Labor can finalize its rule redefining a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

The bill’s premise is that the two agencies have demonstrated an inability to work harmoniously on their fiduciary initiatives. However, this delay in the Labor Department's regulations is also a direct delay in the extension of protections to clients of financial advisers who provide investment advice regarding retirement plans. The bill also does not require the SEC to issue its own rule, so delaying the Department of Labor until SEC acts could effectively prevent the Labor Department from ever issuing its rule.

Further, H.R. 2374 would require that before the SEC promulgates new rules expanding the fiduciary standard in the retail investor context, it must first (1) identify any issues with the current fiduciary structure; and (2) identify whether uniform fiduciary standards for broker dealers and investment advisors would have any adverse effect, resulting in reduced products and services for retail investors.

H.J.Res. 99 - Republicans Complaining About Paying Our Bills

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Pursuant to the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014, the President has requested a suspension of the debt ceiling through February 7, 2014, so that the Treasury can pay America’s bills on time without the threat of default. That Act also allowed for a resolution of disapproval for that request. Similar to the disapproval resolutions that the House passed as part of the Budget Control Act in 2011, this resolution is merely a gimmick aimed at providing House Republicans with political cover.

If this resolution were to become law, it would terminate the debt ceiling suspension provided by the Continuing Appropriations Act and return the threat of default. However, even if both the House and Senate were to pass the resolution of disapproval, it would then be subject to a presidential veto.

Republican brinksmanship has already damaged job creation and caused significant uncertainty for businesses and the markets. After renewed threats of credit rating downgrades, which cited brinksmanship and political gridlock as driving factors, adopting H.J.Res. 99 would send another negative signal to the rest of the world that the United States government is not capable of performing its routine fiscal responsibilities.

H.R. 992 - Swaps Regulatory Improvement Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Currently, Section 716 of the Dodd-Frank Act, known as the “push-out provision,” prohibits any swap dealer or major swap participant registered with the SEC or the CFTC from access to federal assistance, which includes access to any Federal Reserve credit facility and FDIC deposit insurance and guarantees. If a financial institution that receives federal assistance wants to trade derivatives, they must conduct their swap activities in separately capitalized affiliates that are not eligible for federal assistance in the event that the swaps lose money, protecting U.S. taxpayers from risky trades and trade practices.

This bill amends Section 716, to expand the permissible types of swap activities that can be conducted directly by insured financial institutions without losing their access to federal assistance. It also allows uninsured U.S. branches of foreign banks to engage in those swap activities as long as they are covered by a "prudential" regulator in their home nation.

The Rule for H.R. 992, which was adopted yesterday, provides for a closed Rule and one hour of general debate, equally divided and controlled by the chairs and ranking members of the Committee on Financial Services and the Committee on Agriculture.

- 6 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 982 - Helping Those Responsible for Asbestos Injuries and Harming Victims

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would change the rules of the tort system with regard to asbestos-related injuries by requiring quarterly reports of claims made against the trusts and any payouts made by the trusts to asbestos victims. These reports would include the names, exposure history, and amount of payments made from the trust to each claimant. The requirement that asbestos trusts make available on the court's public docket the names of each claimant, together with the other required information, will likely lead to the disclosure of private medical and health information. The bill would also require asbestos settlement trusts to provide outside parties to any lawsuit concerning liability of asbestos exposure with additional information on payments made by such trusts, no matter how irrelevant that information may be, as well as on claims for compensation that have been filed with the trusts. The bill’s disclosure requirements will increase the trusts' administrative costs, forcing them to file burdensome reports and lead to higher costs, delays in the processing of claims and lowered compensation to victims of asbestos. The bill will only benefit those responsible for asbestos injuries and harm asbestos victims and their families by invading their privacy and slowing the claims payment process. Moreover, H.R. 982 is inequitable because it mandates disclosure by the trusts, but does not require solvent defendant companies to disclose information about the injurious effects of the products they manufactured or hazardous working conditions they imposed on their employees.

H.R. 2655 - Blocking a Judge's Use of Discretion Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would change Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure to require that courts impose sanctions on parties that violate the prohibition on the filing of frivolous lawsuits. Rule 11 currently leaves the imposition of sanctions to the discretion of the judge.

This bill represents a reinstatement of discredited rules that were previously in effect, from 1983 – 1993, and triggered almost 7,000 Rule 11 filings, compared with just 19 such filings from 1938 to 1983, when sanctions were not required. Reenactment of these rules would do the exact opposite of their claimed intent, leading to further litigation that is spurred by the prospect of mandatory sanctions and monetary compensation for attorneys’ fees.

The bill specifies that sanctions against parties that file frivolous lawsuits must include monetary payments to the other party for that party's expenses, including attorneys' fees and other costs, discrediting the judicial system by assuming judges are incapable of appropriately punishing abusive lawsuits. The bill would also eliminate the “safe harbor” provisions of Rule 11, under which a motion for sanctions will not be pursued if the challenged filing is withdrawn or corrected within 21 days of service of the motion for sanctions.

This bill would have a wide-ranging impact on civil rights cases, which often involve an "argument for the extension, modification or reversal of existing law or the establishment of a new law," and often have relied upon novel legal theories that are particularly susceptible to abusive claims of frivolity by defendants. Had the provisions in H.R. 2655 been in place at the time, they could have discouraged a number of landmark civil rights cases, including Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, and they could prevent new cases from ever being considered.

H.R. 3350 - [46th ACA Repeal] Permanently Extending Inadequate Individual Plans

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill gives insurance companies the option to continue offering all individual-market plans that were in effect as of January 1, 2013 through 2014 — not just to allow individuals with such policies to keep them but to all consumers, including those who were not previously on the plan. Those policies would be treated as a “grandfathered” health plan that satisfies the minimum essential health insurance coverage requirements set by the Affordable Care Act. However, this bill is actually nothing more than the 46th time that Republicans have voted to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act. By allowing insurance companies to sell plans that do not satisfy the conditions of the exchanges to all consumers, millions of Americans who are expected to benefit from the improved coverage and premium and cost-sharing subsidies available through the new health insurance marketplace will instead see a fractured insurance market and significantly higher premiums. Further, because plans sold prior to 2014 did not need to meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act’s exchanges, enrollees in those plans remain vulnerable to limited coverage policies and abusive insurance company practices. Insurance companies would be able to discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions, restore annual caps on the amount of care you can receive, and force women to pay more than men for the same coverage.

- 5 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

000 - 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1965 - [Harming Environment 7] More Oil and Gas Drilling on Federal Lands Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill requires the Department of the Interior to develop domestic oil and natural gas production goals to meet demand; it increases the amount of federal land available for oil and gas production, including by requiring that at least 25% of eligible federal land be made available each year for leasing and by providing for new oil shale leasing and the leasing of parcels in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska; it hastens the process for approving drilling permits; it also sets new standards for judicial review of civil actions filed against drilling permits; and it includes provisions related to oil and gas resource development on Indian tribal lands. It combines 5 bills – the first bill, H.R. 1965, would require the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to lease at least 25% of lands nominated by the oil and gas industry and to automatically approve any permit which has not been formally decided upon within 60 days. Further, it limits judicial review to 60 days after an approval and prohibits plaintiffs from recouping court and attorney’s fees. The second bill, H.R. 1394, would direct Federal land managers to manage lands for the primary purpose of energy and mineral production, making all other ways that Americans enjoy public lands, like hunting, fishing, camping, grazing, and conservation, secondary. The third bill, H.R. 1964, would require the Secretary of the Interior to develop regulations to require action on drilling permits in the Nation Petroleum Reserve in Alaska within 60 days, despite existing regulations that already require consideration of such applications within 90 days. Further, it would require the BLM to ensure that leases are within 25 miles of roads and pipelines, forcing it to develop a road and pipeline network in the Alaska wilderness, despite no pending BLM applications to construct either. The fourth bill, H.R. 555, would give the Secretary of the Interior the ability to conduct further onshore oil and gas lease sales using internet-based auctions, but does not require the Secretary to do so. The fifth bill, H.R. 1548, would prohibit BLM from enforcing fracking regulations on tribal lands without the consent of the tribal government.

H.R.2728 - [Harming Environment 8] Block Federal Regulation of Natural Gas Fracking Practices

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill prohibits the Interior Department from enforcing federal rules related to hydraulic fracturing in states that have their own fracking oversight rules, and it requires EPA to take certain actions in conducting its study of the impact of fracking on drinking water — including setting a deadline for release of a final report. It combines 2 bills – the first bill, H.R. 2728, prevents the Department of the Interior from enforcing any federal standards on hydraulic fracturing on BLM lands if a state has any rules or guidance governing fracking, no matter how minimal, effectively precluding the federal government from having any oversight, inspection, or enforcement responsibility whatsoever of fracking wells. The second bill, H.R. 2850, would expand study parameters for an on-going EPA study on the effect of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water, however there is some concern that adding them may make the study too cumbersome for EPA to complete.

H.R. 1900 - [Harming Environment 9] Unnecessarily Rush Natural Gas Pipeline Siting Act

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill sets statutory deadlines for Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and other federal agencies to act when considering certification or permits for the construction or expansion of natural gas pipelines. The bill would expedite the approval of certificates of public convenience for interstate natural gas pipelines by setting a deadline for FERC to issue a certificate for a “prefiled” project within 12 months of receiving a complete application. Once FERC issues its final environmental approval regarding the project, the bill would set a 90-day clock on issuance of any necessary project permits by federal agencies. If the agency does not make a decision within that timeframe, the permit would be approved. FERC may extend that time period by 30 days if the agency demonstrates that it cannot complete the process in the required 90 days. However, if the agency cannot reach a decision in that extra 30 days, the permit would be deemed approved.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

H.R. 1105 - Exempting Some Hedge Fund Managers from Dodd-Frank Regulations

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

Under the Dodd-Frank Act, “large” hedge funds and private equity firms (defined as firms having more than $150 million of assets under management and using borrowed funds of more than twice their invested capital commitments) are required to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as investment advisers and provide information about their trades and portfolios. The Dodd Frank Act also requires firms to disclose any employee who has violated securities laws, and report its fees and conflicts of interest. In addition, registered firms must have a compliance program and a code of ethics.

This bill exempts advisers with firms that do not have an outstanding borrowing debt greater than twice the amount of capital investments that have been made by the firm from Dodd-Frank’s registration and reporting requirement, preventing the Financial Stability Oversight Board from using the data to identify systemic risks to the market.

The bill also directs the SEC to develop and issue rules under which those exempt firms would have to maintain records and regularly report to the SEC as the SEC "determines necessary and appropriate in the public interest and for the protection of investors," taking into account a firm’s fund size, governance, investment strategy, and risk.

H.R. 3309 - Innovation Act to Combat Patent Trolls

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

This bill would amend provisions of federal law relating to patents, including the Patent Code codified in USC title 35, with the objective of reducing the abusive litigation practices in patent cases that are used by patent assertion entities (PAEs) – nicknamed “patent trolls.”

The bill seeks to curb abusive patent litigation techniques by directly amending federal judicial procedure rules in patent infringement lawsuits. The bill would amend rules relating to demand letters, pleadings, fee shifting, disclosure of real parties in interest, joinder of parties, end-user stays, and discovery. The bill also directs the Judicial Conference to establish new rules on the timing and cost sharing of discovery, directs the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to create a public database of asserted patent claims, and makes a number of technical corrections to the 2011 Leahy-Smith America Invents Act.

- 1 Suspension

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 3 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 5 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- 4 Suspensions

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

- Bipartisan Budget Deal and SGR Patch

Bill summaries are from the Daily Whip from the day the bill was considered on the House Floor.

The Bipartisan Budget Agreement caps topline discretionary spending for the current fiscal year at $1.012 trillion, about halfway between the Senate budget level of $1.058 trillion and the House budget level of $967 billion, and about $45 billion above the $967 billion FY2014 sequestration levels ascribed by the Budget Control Act (BCA).  In fiscal year 2015, the cap would be raised to $1.013 trillion, $18 billion above FY2015 sequestration levels.  Overall, the agreement provides $63 billion in sequestration relief over the next two years.  Both years of sequester relief split funding evenly between defense and non-defense categories, maintaining the BCA “firewall.”

In addition to sequester relief, the agreement includes approximately $85 billion in mandatory savings and non-tax revenue. It accomplishes this through a number of deficit-reduction provisions, including a decrease in the cost of living adjustment (COLA) for working-age military retirees, a 1.3% increase in retirement contributions by new Federal employees, an increase in security-related fees charged by TSA, and a two-year extension of the Medicare sequester, through FY2023. Overall, the agreement would reduce the deficit by $23 billion over the next ten years.

The Rule combines the Budget Agreement Amendment with a second amendment. The second amendment includes a temporary three-month patch for both the Sustainable Growth Rate and related extenders. It averts a nearly 24% cut in reimbursement rates for Medicare physicians, replacing it with a 0.5% update through March 31, 2014. This patch is offset by a one year extension of current Medicaid DSH (Disproportionate Share Hospitals) policy, extending cuts to those hospitals for another year through FY2023, as well as changes to how Long-Term Care Hospitals (LTCHs) are paid, altering the ways that patients can qualify for higher payment rate.